Full Form of MBBS, BDS, BAMS, BUMS, B. Sc. Nursing

Full Form of MBBS, BDS, BAMS, BUMS, B. Sc. Nursing

Full Form of MBBS, BDS, BAMS, BUMS, B. Sc. Nursing: Science, especially medicine, can be both mysterious and difficult to grasp. It is both miraculous and overwhelming because even a small drug or injection can cure a serious disease. Learning medical sciences requires a high degree of commitment. Many young medical studies are concerned with the full forms of MBBS, BDS, and other courses.

On the other hand, many others are oblivious of the complete forms of BAMS, BUMS, B.Sc., and other related courses. The complete forms of these courses can be difficult to grasp at times. Students often become perplexed by the course’s abbreviations and find themselves in a challenging situation. Since they don’t have access to full forms of these courses, students have a hard time remembering them.

Candidates who are having trouble understanding the full forms of BUMS, BAMS, BHMS, and other allied courses can now get answers from this post. We have included the full form and a brief of MBBS, BUMS, BAMS, and other allied courses in this article for the benefit of those interested in the field of medicine.

Full Forms And Brief of The Courses

  • MBBS Full Form: Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Science is abbreviated as MBBS. The course lasts 5.5 years, and to obtain an MBBS degree, a student must have a +2 in subjects like physics, biology, and chemistry.
  • Full Form of BDS: Bachelor in Dental Surgery is abbreviated as BDS. The course goes into the specifics of dental conditions and how to treat them. It is a 5-year program in which students must pass their 10+2 exams in subjects such as biology, chemistry, and physics with a 50 percent overall score.
  • BHMS Full Form: Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery is a bachelor’s degree program in homeopathy. It is a medical degree program at the undergraduate level. It is a five-year program that consists of four years of research and one year of internship. Admission to the BHMS program is through an entrance test, and students must have completed a 10+2 diploma from an accredited board to apply.
  • Full Form of BUMS: Bachelor in Unani Medicine and Surgery is abbreviated as BUMS. It’s a five-year bachelor’s degree program. It covers allopathic medicine as well as the study of medicine. It is a thorough course that teaches about the healing mechanisms that depend on the body’s natural power. The candidate for this course must be at least 17 years old and have completed 10+2 from an accredited board.
  • Full Form of BAMS: Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine, and Surgery (BAMS) is an acronym for Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine, and Surgery. It’s also a five-year undergraduate program where students learn about ayurvedic medicine and treatment methods. It also includes information on modern medicine.
  • B.Sc. Nursing Full Form: Bachelor of Science in Nursing is abbreviated as B.Sc. Nursing. It is a four-year bachelor’s degree program. It covers all aspects of nursing methods, and to apply for the course, a student must have completed 10+2 from a recognized university or board.
  • B.VSc Full Form: Bachelor of Veterinary Sciences (B.VSc) is the abbreviation for Bachelor of Veterinary Sciences. It is the study of different diseases in animals and how they are treated. It’s a five-and-a-half-year program with a six-month internship requirement at the end. To apply for the course, a student must have completed 10+2 with a minimum of 50% aggregate.
  • BNYS Full Form: Bachelor in Naturopathy and Yoga Sciences is abbreviated as BNYS. The study of natural medicine and yogic methods to cure and treat different diseases is known as BNYS. It is a 4.5-year program that allows students to have completed their 12th grade from an approved board.
  • BSMS Full Form: Bachelor of Siddha Medicine and Sciences (BSMS) is an acronym for Bachelor of Siddha Medicine and Sciences. It is a five-year program that involves four years of intensive classroom study and one year of mandatory internship. The study of ancient remedies and complementary methods of treating patients is the focus of this course.
  • B. Sc. EMT Full Form: Emergency Medical Technology is a bachelor’s degree program. The course discusses everything there is to know about emergency responses to vital healthcare needs. Students pursuing a B. Sc. in EMT must research in-depth the preparation, organization, and all other forms of assistance that a patient needs in an emergency.
  • BASLP Full Form: Bachelor of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology is an abbreviation for Bachelor of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology. It is a four-year curriculum that includes both theoretical and clinical instruction. The course addresses all aspects of speech and hearing disabilities, as well as their care.
  • BOT Full Form: Bachelor in Occupational Therapy is abbreviated as BOT. The course teaches students how to use multiple clinical approaches to treat a variety of physical and psychological issues.

Conclusion on Full Form of MBBS, BDS, BAMS, BUMS, B. Sc. Nursing

We assume that the data on the diverse clinical courses that we have given above will be useful to young aspirants. We hope that the complete forms of MBBS, BDS, BAMS, BHMS, and other medical degrees are now clear to readers. This will help them throughout their lives, and they will have no trouble recalling these complete forms. The above material will also offer kids a broad knowledge of the relevant courses relevant to the field of medicine.

If We Must Die Analysis by Claude McKay | Structure, Literary Devices, Summary and Analysis

If We Must Die Analysis

If We Must Die Analysis: The poet was born in Jamaica on September 15, 1889. Claude McKay travelled to Harlem, New York, after publishing his first books of poetry. He established himself as a literary voice for social justice during the Harlem Renaissance.

He published his next poems in 1917 under the anonym Eli Edwards. More poems appeared in Pearson’s Magazine and the Liberator. The Liberator poems included “If We Must Die,” which became the voice of the oppressed in no time.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

McKay turned to the United States in 1921 and committed himself to various social and political issues prevalent at that time. He operated with the Universal Negro Improvement Association and continued to explore Communism and understand its concept in depth.

McKay’s viewpoints and poetic achievements in the earlier part of the twentieth century set the voice for the Harlem Renaissance’s backdrop and gained the deep respect of younger and rising black poets of that time.

Although he was an atheist initially, he took up Catholicism in the end years of his life, retreating from his ideals of Communism. He became an official American citizen in 1940.

McKay died of a heart attack in Chicago, Illinois, on May 22, 1948.

His work has been an inspiration for the struggle of the black Americans and set the war cry for them.

If We Must Die Analysis Structure

The poem is a Shakespearean sonnet of fourteen lines. The rhyming scheme employed in the poem is of the type ABABCDCDEFEFGG. Each line consists of two beats spread across five sets.

It is made of three four-line sets and an ending couplet. A couplet is a pair of successive lines of metre in poetry that follow a rhyming scheme.

If We Must Die Literary Devices

Enjambment is a speech figure where a line of poetry carries its idea or thought over to the next line without a grammatical pause. The use of enjambment can be seen in the lines, “If we must die, let it not be like hogs/ Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot,”.

Alliteration uses repetition of the same consonant sounds at the beginning of words close to each other. Alliteration is featured in the /h/ sound in “hogs,” hunted,” and “hungry.”

Caesura is the employment of metrical pause or breaks in a verse where one phrase ends and another line begins. The use of caesura divides out the poem’s opening phrase—”If we must die”—as particularly important and so prepares the reader for the return of that same phrase in “If we must die, O let us nobly die,”.

A metaphor is used to directly referring to one thing by mentioning another. The phrase “mad and hungry dogs” is an example of the use of a metaphor. It compares the dogs to the torture inflicting white.

A simile is a way of comparing two things directly. It uses words such as “like” and “as”. The phrase “like hogs” features the use of simile.

If We Must Die by Claude McKay

If We Must Die Summary

The poet wrote this poem during the Harlem Renaissance as a voice against the violence done on the blacks. This period was marked by the severe hardships endured by the black people of America.

The poet denounces racial violence and calls the black population to raise their voice against the injustices and inequalities mated to them.

The poem argues that drastic mortal acts of revolution are the only viable option for this oppressed group to claim their freedom back with their heads held high.

The poet puts forward the idea that they will not die without putting up a strong fight. They will not be weak and take death heads on like noblemen.

If We Must Die Detailed Analysis

Lines 1-4

“If we must die, let it not be like hogs

Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot,

While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs,

Making their mock at our accursèd lot.”

The poem starts with the idea that if the oppressed black people have to die, they should not die like “hogs”. They should fight for their cause and not give in to the brutality executed on them.

Hogs or pigs have the most unfateful death since they are slaughtered mercilessly for their meat.

He further urges his community to be rebellious. He mentions that he does not wish to be mocked.

The mention of the dogs brings forward the stark difference between a hunter and a hunted. Dogs fight till their last breath and never give up. They mock their prey and know that they are easy to kill.

Similarly, the poet highlights that his race should strive for their cause and not be mocked by the ones ready to prey on them.

Lines 5-8

“If we must die, O let us nobly die,

So that our precious blood may not be shed

In vain; then even the monsters we defy

Shall be constrained to honor us though dead!”

These lines reiterate the message of dying with honour. The poet embarks on the idea that their blood should not be lost. They will fight for their freedom and give their lives if they need to.

They should strive towards freedom with strong determination. Even the oppressors should feel a sense of respect towards their zeal and honour them.

They should not shed even a single drop of their blood meaninglessly, and their resolution should be powerful enough to be acknowledged even by their oppressors. Their bravery should set a milestone.

Their voice and struggle should be looked up to and be the benchmark for future generations.

By referring to the oppressors as “monsters”, he depicts the severity of the torture inflicted upon them. The white population was vicious towards black Americans.

Although this period witnessed a change towards the treatment of black Americans, it was only limited in the books. The reality was far from the change and was completely different.

Lines 9-14

“O kinsmen! we must meet the common foe!

Though far outnumbered let us show us brave,

And for their thousand blows deal one death-blow!

What though before us lies the open grave?

Like men, we’ll face the murderous, cowardly pack,

Pressed to the wall, dying, but fighting back!”

The poet calls the people of his community to face the oppressors with might and conviction. Although they are more in number than the poet’s community, they should not submit to them but put up a strong fight.

He encourages them to take up the situation heads on and not be afraid. He says that if they have to die, they should die with a purpose and not get doomed in the ruins of time.

He wants his people to unite and fight together. He calls the white population a “murderous, cowardly pack” and highlights that they are inevitable and can be defeated.

The phrase “open grave” characterises the fact that the end of the struggle is inevitable death. The poet knows about the futility of the course of their struggle. He knows that the end will be met by death.

Although there is death stored for them, it should not deter them from persisting till the end.

Poems About Horse | List of 10 Best Poems About Horse

Poems About Horse: The poets portray the simple components of nature in a way that gives a new perspective to the reader. Horses have their significance in human lives in many ways for ages, and the poets, through their pen, express their love for the creatures. Here in this article, we will get to know about ten such poems about horse riding which are loved by many readers around the world.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

Horse and Men in Rain by Carl Sandburg

‘Horse and Men in Rain’ by Carl Sandburg was written in 1918. The poem focuses on storytelling as the main plot of the poem. The poem tells the story of the underprivileged people of the society, such as the ‘mail carriers’ and ‘milk wagon drivers’ through images that illustrate their daily lives.

In this poem, the poet compares the misery of the lives of these people with the speaker and the listener. This three-stanza poem is not bounded by a rhyme scheme, yet it expresses the poet’s vision in beautiful images which the reader can easily imagine or visualize.

Boot and Saddle by Robert Browning

‘Boot and Saddle’ by Robert Browning is the third part of the ‘Cavalier Tunes’. In this poem, the speaker is a supporter of Charles of England, and Oliver Cromwell, Charles’s enemy, has devised a plan to attack the castle.

The speaker rides on his horse to rescue the Brancepeth Castle but, in the end, addresses that surrendering to the enemy is not an option and urges to fight.

The poem is a perfectly rhymed one and follows the AAAA rhyme scheme, and hence it has been turned into a song as the musical texture already exists in the poem.

The White Horse by D.H. Lawrence

D.H. Lawrence’s ‘The White Horse’ is a short yet influential poem with a single stanza consisting of three lines. The poem’s plot is based on a white horse and a youth and how both of them exist in their own worlds, respectively.

This poem does not follow a rhyming pattern and consists of minute details, making the reader read between the lines. The final line of the poem leaves the reader to interpret what the phrases’ so silent’ and ‘in another world’ depict.

Poems About Horse

The Undertaker’s Horse by Rudyard Kipling

‘The Undertaker’s Horse’ was written in 1885 by Rudyard Kipling in the early stages of his career, but it reflects that Rudyard Kipling was thinking about his demise when he was young.

The poem tells the story of a horse of an undertaker who carries corpses to their resting place for burial. The poet wonders about his death and whether, in his last ride to his grave, the same horse will accompany him or he will live longer than the horse.

This is an eight-stanza poem consisting of six lines in each stanza and uses lexical repetitions such as him, your, I; to highlight a significant image.

The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes

‘The Highwayman’ is a romantic narrative poem written by Alfred Noyes and was first published in Blackwood’s Magazine in 1906.

The poem is based on the life of an unknown highwayman who falls in love with Bess, an innkeeper’s daughter. Due to circumstances, the highwayman and Bess both fail to give their love a destination when alive, but in the end, they meet again as ghosts on a winter night.

The poem uses literary devices to depict the deep love that the central characters of the poem nurture. Some of the tools used are symbolism, repetition, metaphors, assonance and others.

The Old Horse in the City by Vachel Lindsay

‘The Old Horse in the City’, written by Vachel Lindsay, is a short three-stanza poem about an old horse who is tortured and ill-treated by his masters and how he wishes to escape.

The narrator of the poem is the aged horse, and he dreams of being free someday. The horse is hopeful and believes that he can ‘break the halter-rope’ and ‘smash the stable-door’ to escape from the misery he is living in.

The poet makes sufficient uses of metaphors along with other poetic tools, which makes the reader think of the significance of the situation, and the reader gets hooked on the poem.

At Grass by Philip Larkin

‘At Grass’ was written by Philip Larkin and published in the year 1955. The poem explores contrasting themes such as life and death, past and present.

This poem is divided into five stanzas, where each stanza consists of six lines. This poem is classified as a ‘lyric poem’ with a formal verse and follows an ABCABC rhyme scheme.

The poem revolves around the racehorses that once were the centre of attraction and received infinite appreciations and applauses. After they retired, they spend the rest of their lives grazing in the field as they are now forgotten as strength, beauty, wealth – nothing is eternal.

10 Poems About Horse

The Horse Poisoner by Thomas Lux

Thomas Lux’s ‘The Horse Poisoner’ is a poem about untimely and strange serial deaths of horses in the farms of a specific areaand the investigation followed by the incidents.

This poem’s structure consists of a single stanza comprising of twenty-seven lines without following a particular rhyming scheme. This narrative poem explains the incidents happening around the speaker from his perspective and how he thinks something mysterious is happening to the horses.

One of the most important poetic devices used in this poem is imagery, as while reading the poem, the reader can not only visualize the situation but also sense the mystery around that place.

Why Some Girls Love Horses by Paisley Rekdal

‘Why Some Girls Love Horses’ was written by Paisley Rekdal. This poem is a ‘coming of age’ story, where the speaker of the poem is a woman in her adulthood, and the poem talks about her journey from a young girl to a grown-up woman.

The poet beautifully uses the poetic device of symbolism, where the speaker’s horse named Dandy is presented as a symbol in the poem. The symbol tells about the importance of freedom in one’s life and how it helps to grow the person from within.

On the Horse and His Rider by John Bunyan

‘On the Horse and His Rider’ by John Bunyan is a poem about a horse and his rider and their relationship. The poem consists of two stanzas, and the poet uses a unique way of dividing the same, which is by using ‘Comparison.’ as a divider between them.

The poem emphasizes the relationship between the animal and the human, and the speaker says that the rider should know his ride and learn about the signals to ride them. Similarly, the horse should know about his companion, which is the rider and hence a healthy relationship gets developed between the horse and his ‘guider’.

Define Lyric Poems | Origin, History, Types, Classification, Examples and Other Names

Define Lyric Poems

Define The Word Lyric Poems: When the poets write any poem which is emotional and rhyming, it is called a lyric poem. Such types of poems are known to explore strong emotions, especially romantic feelings.

How To Write A Lyric Poem?

A lyric poem is a short version of a poem, which has almost songlike e features. The root word of a lyric is a lyre, which is of Greek origin and means “singing to the lyre.” The pronunciation of lyric is done as leeyr-rick. Any lyric poem is easily identified by its musical nature.

Short and high musical verses characterize a lyric poem. They can convey extremely powerful meanings. In a lyrical poem, the poets make use of literary devices like rhyme or meter. These literary devices create a songlike quality within the poem.

The feelings or emotions conveyed through the poem are most likely to be related to the poet himself’s feelings. It is one of the most common poetic forms that are still found today. The most common takeaways of lyric poems are that they convey the speaker’s emotions and are musical.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

The Origin And History Of Lyricism

The origin of lyricism in poems can be traced to Greek culture. In Greece, it was most often found that lyric poetry was combined with music and was played on lyre. A lyre is a string instrument with a U shape. The works of Sappho (610 to 570 BC) have shown lyricism most often.

In ancient Greece, there was a specific meaning ascribed to lyric poetry. The technical meaning of it was a verse often accompanied by a lyre, barbitos, or cithara.

Similar traits of lyricism were found in other parts of the world too. It was between the fourth century BC and the first century AD that lyricism came to view through the Hebrew poets’ works. These poets composed lyrical psalms, which the people sang in an ancient Jewish style.

During the eighth century, through haiku and various other forms, the Japanese poets expressed their ideals. They often expressed their emotions through lyrical poems too. Among the more famous Chinese writers, Li Po (710 to 762 AD) depicted aspects of lyricism in his work.

There was a shift from their regular epic narratives about gods and war heroes in the western world. This gave rise to lyric poetry in their domain, and in the western world, lyric poetry came with a personal tone and appeal. The poets of Europe drew their inspiration from Greece and also from Egypt or Asia.

Lyric Poetry Types

The most common categories that poetry is put into are three: Narrative, Lyric, and lastly, Dramatic. Lyric poetry is, however, the most common. It is extremely difficult to classify it, yet there is a wide range of approaches to it.

It is difficult to be classified as nearly anything, from war to love, from art to patriotism, that can be easily explored in a personal and emotional tone. Thus there are many approaches to it.

There is also no prescribed form of lyrical poetry. Some sonnets can be considered lyrical poetry, and there are also rondeaus to villanelles that are considered lyrical poetry.

Lyric Poem Classification

Many times scholars tend to categorize lyrical poetry into Lyric of Thought, Lyric of Emotion, and Lyric of Vision. But, this type of categorization is not agreed upon by many scholars.

There can be didactic poems in the Lyric of Thought type, which are usually directed at teaching. It also includes intellectual poems, like satire.

In the Lyric of Vision type, there are visual poetries like May Swenson’s “Women.” There are line arrangements and a zigzag pattern in the poem, which makes it visual. Some other poets have used colors or 3D shapes and even unusual topography for satisfying Lyric of Vision.

In the Lyric of Emotion type, some poems depict emotions and sensations. The works are usually associated with the personification of sentiments and expression of human emotions.

What Is The Reason Behind Writing It?

Lyrical poetry depicts a wide range of things, including emotions, admissions, and even confessions. They have a flowery and flowy language and are simple yet deep at the same time.

So, the simplest reason that poets resort to lyrical poems is that they can easily express their feelings and emotions through them. The audience relates to such poems easily, and it is an effortless way of understanding the nature around us.

Lyric Poems

Examples Of Lyricism In Famous Poems

Example 1: “The Wold Is Too Much With Us” by William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth (1770 to 1850) is a famous name among the English poets. It was the notion of Wordsworth that poetry is a powerful flow of feelings.

“The world is too much with us; late and soon,

Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; —

Little we see in Nature that is ours;

We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!”

In his poem “The World Is Too Much With Us,” he has clearly expressed his passion, which is clearly illustrated in a few statements like “a sordid boon!”. Wordsworth has condemned materialism and alienation from nature in his poem.

Although the poem depicts the essence of spontaneity, it was also carefully nurtured. In this poem, the poet has clearly expressed his outrage about the Industrial Revolution’s effects on the then economy.

Example 2: “Praise Song for the Day” by Elizabeth Alexander

The poem “Praise Song for the Day” was written by Elizabeth Alexander, a famous American poet. She wrote the poem to be read at President Barack Obama’s inauguration, the first-ever black president.

“Say it plain: that many have died for this day.

Sing the names of the dead who brought us here,

who laid the train tracks, raised the bridges,

picked the cotton and the lettuce, built

brick by brick, the glittering edifices

they would then keep clean and work inside of.

Praise song for struggle, praise song for the day.

Praise song for every hand-lettered sign,

the figuring-it-out at kitchen tables.”

Through the poem, Alexander paid tribute to the African culture that lay in the US and urged the people belonging to various races to live in peace. Although the poem does not rhyme, its rhythmic repetition of phrases creates a beautiful musical effect.

The poem serves two traditions. One, it is an occasional poem, which was written for a specific purpose, and two, it is a song for praising someone. It depicts the essence of praise for the American president. Occasional poems are quite similar to ode, as they depict passionate expressions of praise.

Example 3: “Do not go gentle into that good night” by Dylan Thomas

Dylan Thomas (1914 to 1953) has depicted lyricism through his poem “Do not go gentle into that good night.” He has used a number of literary devices in the poem.

“Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at the close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,

Because their words had forked no lightning they

Do not go gentle into that good night.”

This poem depicts a son’s plea to his father, who is dying. He wants to explain to his father that death is the ultimate end for all. Nevertheless, they do not give up. They constantly fight for their life. The entire poem seems to be based on the line “Old age should burn and rave at close of day.”

The literary devices like alliteration and repetition of a specific line are continuously done throughout the poem. The rhyme scheme of the poem is simple and consistent, going on at ABC ABC. These features show the characteristic of lyricism throughout the poem.

Example 4: “Dying” penned by Emily Dickinson

Most of the poems by Emily Dickinson (1830 to 1886) depict the essence of lyricism.

“I heard a fly buzz when I died;

The stillness round my form

Was like the stillness in the air

Between the heaves of storm.

The eyes beside had wrung them dry,

And breaths were gathering sure

For that last onset, when the king

Be witnessed in his power.”

The poem “Dying” depicts in the way of its simple rhyme scheme, ABCB. There is also the use of Iambic meter, which is yet another feature of a lyric poem. The poet here speaks about her observations when someone is about to die.

Her poem is hypothetical in nature and expresses her sentiments about death. The poet expresses her detachment from the affairs of the world.

Some Other Popular Lyric Poems

  • “Whose List to Hunt” written by Sir Thomas Wyatt
  • “Upon Julia’s Clothes,” written by Robert Herrick
  • “The Heart Asks Pleasure First” penned by Emily Dickinson
  • “A Quoi bon Dire” by Charlotte Mew
  • “Lines Written a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey” penned by William Wordsworth.

Other Names Of Lyricism

There are other terms that often come to describe lyric poems. Some common terms that people might come across are:

  • Musical
  • Emotional
  • Melodious
  • Melody
  • Expression

Stopping By The Woods On A Snowy Evening By Robert Frost | Stanzas, Summary, Analysis, Themes, Literary Devices

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis Line by Line: Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening, a poem written by Robert frost in 1922 was published in New Hampshire in 1923. The set up of the poetry is that of a winter evening that experiences a solitary traveller’s dilemma, who, being in solitude and amidst nature, is enchanted by the charm and beauty of the same.

However, he is constantly distracted by the thought of his duty in the world that breaths its heavy breath on his shoulder and pulls him away from the woods, breaking its charm. Being raised around nature, this poem by Robert Frost is often said to have autobiographical elements.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

Summary of Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

The narrator of the poem has set out for completing his daily chores, and on his way to his pre-decided destination, his path crosses with a silent, desolate and snow-clad wood.

The poem begins with the narrator contemplating the woods’ owner and settling with him being somebody he knows, whose house is in the village. Then, he says that it won’t be practically feasible for the woods owner to see him stop by, to experience his woods, in such a snowy evening.

He was there to behold the woods get wrapped by the layers of snow. According to the narrator, it was the darkest evening of the season, and his horse was baffled to find his owner stop mid-way to their destination, with no farmhouse nearby, in an odd juncture between the frozen lake and the woods. The woods were very silent and calm. The very little sounds that were occurring were reaching the narrator clearly.

There were only the ring of bells from his horse’s harness, as it was trying to wake up its owner from the trance and ask if he was making some mistake by behaving the way that he was, apart from this, the only sound was that of the flowing wind and the raining snow.

The narrator praises the features of the woods, calls them by appealing adjectives and finally conjectures that he has to leave them, as he has made promises that he needs to fulfil and reiterate in the concluding couplets that he has to traverse a long path and complete many tasks before he sleeps his final sleep.

Summary Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

Meaning of The Poem Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

There are an array of underlying connotations and meanings that we can extract out of the poem. This poem portrays the inevitability of human life’s duties and responsibilities and the circuit of events that are placed as concentric layers, one after the other.

Opposed to this, the poet shows how calm, serene and pacific nature is. The poet also highlights a predominant fact in the poem: how humankind is a doit before nature’s power. Through the narrator’s character, the poet displays how some of the most sensitive souls often get enthralled and enchanted by the immense and ethereal beauty of nature and surrenders to its peace.

By employing several metaphors, the poet delineates how even one’s personal conscience, accompanied by the consistent call of duty and responsibility, is responsible for separating humans from the peace and calm of nature. One such metaphor is the horse, and the horse is the symbol of duty and realty that rings the bell to wake up the narrator. There are several embedded references to the journey of life –

“And miles to go before I sleep

And miles to go before I sleep”

Here, miles of the journey of life is indicated, terminating at the final ‘sleep’. The poem begins at a point in time that falls in between a journey of the narrator – this journey is actually that of life. It is the celebration of peace in nature against the hullabaloo of human life.

Thereby, it talks about how the exhausted human souls pine for obliterating the thought of reality and merging with the solace that nature provides them. The narration, which tells how the narrator had stopped in between his course of work to observe snowing in the woods, hint that nature and its agents act as agents that intervene in the humans’ monotonous daily, provides some respite and disappears suddenly. In contrast, humans have to continue their cycle of life.

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Poem Speaker

The speaker of the poem is a traveller who is drawn by the woods covered in winter snow and is shown to be occupied by conflicting thoughts of choosing to stay back in the lap of nature or go ahead with his pre-conceived obligations.

The poet does not give any name to the speaker of the poem, and this shows that he is trying to talk about the common man, and this poem can thereby, be treated as a microcosm of the wider world, and the speaker, the representative of the many other common men facing similar issues.

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis Symbols

There is many symbols or insignias employed by the poet in the course of the poem. ‘sleep’ over here is a symbol of death or eternal sleep, the horse here stands for human conscience and the reality, and the bell that it rings is the grim bite of reality that obstructs the trance of the narrator. The woods over here stands as the massive entity of nature, and the journey of the traveller refers to the journey of life.

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis Structure and Form

The poem is written in the Iambic tetrameter and abides by a regular flow in the rhyming characteristic of the form called the Rubaiyat stanza. The whole poem follows the AABA rhyme scheme.

Literary Devices Used in Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis

Some of the literary devices employed by the poet in the poem are,

Metaphor: The poet has used several metaphors along the length of the poem. ‘Sleep’ signifying death or eternal sleep or the final sleep, the journey of the traveller indicates towards the journey of life, the event of the horse’s movements causing the bells to rings and eventually the narrator’s calm to disrupt signifies the knock of reality on the door of conscience.

Imagery: The poet has crafted a synesthetic experience for the readers and aroused all the senses of threaders equally in the poem’s experience. The ‘easy wind’ touching the skin, the ringing of bells reaching the ears, the sight of the beautiful woods before the eyes and the smell of nature, all these agents have cumulatively worked to cause the effect. The poet has also illustrated the woods’ image and its calm very delicately so that the readers can see it all and sense it all intimately.

Personification: The horse over here has been personified and ascribed with humane traits. The woods, too, has been given a spirit of their own that also gives it the power to attract distressed travellers and distract them from the course of their lives.

Alliteration: The ‘sound’s the sleep’ is the usage of alliteration in the piece.

Euphony: The poet has studded some elements in the poem that causes auditory pleasure to the readers. The ease of the wind, the ‘downy flakes’ and the ring of bells are some of the examples that set the auditory sensations to act.

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Themes

Some of the subdivisions of the many themes of the poem are,

Nature against Humans: The poem displays how nature is the superpower, and humans’ power stands at no place before that. Eventually, the humans subjugate to nature after being drained by their own constructs.

Personal Yearnings Against Social Responsibility: The narrator’s experience as narrated through the poem clearly elaborates how humans are compelled to let go of their individual to fit the social. The traveller’s internal want was to remain within the lap of nature. However, the socially ascribes responsibilities drove him away from him a recluse.

Indecisiveness, Doubt, Settlement And Decision: Since the poem’s commencement, we see how the speaker suffers from indecision about following his heart’s desire and abiding by his mind’s dictates. However, we also see how he settles with one end of the spectrum and makes a decision.

Significance of the Poem Title

“Stopping by woods in a snowy Evening” – the title encapsulates the entire journey that the poem offers for the readers. The poem is about a traveller who stops by the woods on a sudden evening when the woods were wrapped in snow.

Meaning of The Poem Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis, Stanza by Stanza

“Whose woods these are I think

I know.

His house is in the village

Though;

He will not see me stopping

Here

To watch his woods fill up with

Snow”

In stanza 1 of the poem, we are introduced to the traveller, who has stopped by random woods while on the way to his destination. He observed the woods and declared that although he is familiar with the owner of the woods, the owner will not be able to know that he had stopped by his woods to see the snow cover it- This declaration implies that he does not want anybody to know this because humans are not allowed to get distracted and digress from their singular tone of life. Therefore, he intends to see the woods fill up with snow, hiding from the rest of the world as well as his duties.

Stanza 2

“My little horse must think it

Queer

To stop without a farmhouse

Near

Between the woods and frozen

Lake

The darkest evening of the

Year”

In stanza 2, the narrator elucidates how his act of stopping in front of the woods has looked ‘queer’ to his horse because that is always only used to stop in front of farmhouses for business. However, this time, the narrator has broken the usual rule and stopped mid-way, in the way between the lake frozen in winter, and the woods. This implies that he recognizes the abnormality in his action – something that will be looked at with eyes of awe by not only his fellow harbingers of humanity but also his little horse.

“He gives his harness bells a

Shake

To ask if there is some

Mistake.

The only other sound’s the

Sweep

Of easy wind and downy flakes”

Stanza 3

In stanza 3, the narrator describes the serenity of the woods, where there is practically no sound, apart from the easy flowing wind and the snow that is streaming down – this environment of the woods crafted by the poet creates the essence of the woods as relaxed, soft and calm. Opposed to this, the horse, which is symbolic of reality and duty, is characterized by restlessness, as it rings the bell of its harness, calling the narrator back to consciousness and disturbing the peace of nature.

“The woods are lovely, dark and

Deep

But I have promises to keep

And miles to go before I sleep

And miles to go before I sleep”

Stanza 4

In stanza 4, the narrator delineates the beauty of the woods with adjectives like ‘lovely’. He also calls the dark of the woods intensified by the darkest evening of the season. However, at the concluding lines of the poem, the narrator reaches a decision, where he recognizes that he has made promises earlier that must be kept.

Therefore, he has miles to travel, fulfilling the many promises before he ‘sleep’ or breath his last with the termination of life and all obligations or death.

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis Historical Context

In 1923, when the piece was published, society saw a certain trend in society’s growth and evolution. Individuals were allowed the liberty to think their way, express their way and not subscribe to the pre-set traditions.

The ideologies of intellectuals, philosophers, and social activists such as Marx, Freud etcetera, did not remain restricted to just the elite class and erudite, but percolated to society’s various layers and were discussed everywhere.

Every sector of society followed this trend in society, so did the sector of literature. Several composers started several forms and revolutions of their own challenging traditionalism in writing and thinking in literature.

This trend of thoughts that arose after world war one was born out of the sense of alienation that the war had caused to the people, which gave them a wider and split view of human existence. These triggered a sense of distance between the people affected by war and the traditions that bound them to their society all the while.

This caused them to easefully sever all ties with the bound of tradition and liberate their individual ideas about the thing – this eventually gave birth to new philosophies that they expressed in their selective, personal ways. These humans who had abjected society and the human manifestations, ceded to nature, and enjoyed its company and introspected its ways – this led to the birth of multiple pieces of literature.

Another kind of alienation came from the industrialization, and the poets, thinkers and composers who came up from regions of agriculture and nature were pushed towards industrialized city life, something that they could not adjust – this often led them to retrospect the good times that they had spent in the lap of nature.

Personal Commentary

The poem is a voice for the many others who are victims of similar sorts of events. The traveller is a prototype of multiple others like him. All them, who are compelled to be a slave of industrialism and capitalism and are driven by the societal coercions of reaching the destination, often yearn for the glorious past that they had spent.

However, they cannot express their innate desire out in the open before the society because they will be criticized by the society and considered abnormal – much like the traveller in the poem, who wants to enjoy the mirth and calm from the woods in secrecy, hidden from any human eye, and the horse – an instrument of human domination finds this behaviour ‘queer’ much like his fellow humans.

Similar Poetry’s of Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Analysis

Some other poems that hold similar essence as stopping by the woods are :

I Wander’d Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth:

This poem, composed by William Wordsworth upon his developed theory of emotions recollected in tranquillity, tells about another traveller who comes across a bunch of ‘golden daffodils’ and is enthralled by the beauty of those, which are swaying to the tune of the wind, are dancing and making mirth as a bunch.

The daffodils were sprinkled all over the land and looked as if they stretched till endless land limits. The narrator of this poem says that he will remember the daffodils’ beauty every time he feels ‘vacant’ and ‘pensive’. Therefore, in this poem, too, we see how nature has provided respite to tired souls, charmed them with its beauty and instilled energy and will in them that has motivated them to continue in life.

Nutting by William Wordsworth:

“I came to one dear nook

Unvisited, where not a broken bough

Drooped with its withered leaves, ungracious

Sign

Of devastation; but the hazels rose

Tall and erect, with tempting clusters hung,

A virgin scene!- A little while I stood ,

Breathing with such suppression of the heart

As joy delights in; and, with wise restraint

Voluptuous, fearless of a rival, eyed

The banquet”

Over here, the poet describes the beauty of virgin nature and how even a little boy who has seen very little of beauty is encaptivated by the grace and natural beauty and fins peace amongst nature.

However, the poem ends with a description of how human’s nature is to destroy and mutilate virgin nature. Despite that, the little kid is shown guilty of his act and is shown repenting for his own actions. This kid is typically the sort of people who grow up around nature.

Ode to a Nightingale – John Keats

“What thou among the leaves hast never

Known,

The weariness, the fever, and the fret

Here, where men sit and hear each other

Groan;

Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last grey hairs,

Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies”

Over here, the poet talks about the ills of human flesh and the difficulties of human life and pitches it against the lives of the nightingale. The poet uses the nightingale as an agent of nature, who lives in the utopian world that is devoid of the problems of the human world, and the poet wants to fly away to their world of permanence and perfection, leaving behind the cage of skin as well as the problems of human life. Here too, we see how the narrator acquires respite from the song of the nightingale, which is an agent of nature itself.

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver | Summary, Analysis, Poetic Techniques and Structure

Wild Geese Mary Oliver

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver Meaning: Mary Oliver was an American poet who was born in 1935. She was an inspiring poet who won the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. She was honoured with the title of Country’s Best-Selling Poet in 2007. She is popular for her unique style of writing inspired by the natural wonders of the world. Her style is very straightforward.

Wild Geese was a poem published in 1986 in her seventh collection of poems called Dream Work. She has written numerous other poems. Her poems are known to be a love for nature as it urges readers to accept the beauty of nature and enjoy its wonders.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

Wild Geese shows the characteristic interest of the poet in the co-existence of nature and humans. Other famous works where she explores nature and its relationship with humanity include “Poppies”, “Morning Poems”, “Sleeping in the Forest”, and “The Black Walnut Tree”.

Summary of Wild Geese

The speaker tells the readers to stop aspiring for perfection. She instead wants the readers to look around the beauty of the world and realize that no matter how deceived you feel about yourself, the wonders of nature will never cease to amaze humanity. Thus, do not necessarily crave perfection, but be yourself.

The speaker preaches that you(reader) do not have to walk on your knees for a hundred miles and repent your sins. You need to be easy and kind to yourself and let your soul love what it wants. The speaker asks the reader to tell about your despairs and sadness; in turn, the speaker will tell you her own.

While you share your sorrows with the speaker, you must realize that however lonely you are, the world and nature are playing their strings of the instrument, doing harmonious wonders. She says that the sun and the crystal rain are moving across the landscapes of the prairies, deep forests, mountains and rivers.

Meanwhile, the wild geese are heading home, announcing your place in the family of this world. The central theme of this poem is motivation. The poet wants to motivate a dried soul so that it blooms the way nature blooms.

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver Structure

The poem is written in one stanza, comprising of eighteen lines. The style is free verse, and no significant use of rhyming words are found. The poem is simple in narration without any complicated use of words or expressions.

We can see one simile in the last lines of the poem- like the wild geese. The poet uses subtle half-rhymes to make the reading smooth. The words such as prairies and deep trees, exciting and things, etc., are carefully used to make the reading smooth and straightforward.

These structural methods used in the poem make it a soulful read.

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver Poetic Techniques

The poetic techniques involved in the poem are repetition, alliteration, half-rhymes, anaphora and enjambment. These are the standard techniques that are used by poets to highlight the aesthetic of a poem.

Repetition technique is the simple repetition of words or a cluster of words in different consecutive lines. The explicit use of repetition can be noticed in the first two lines, where Oliver uses “you do not have to” repeatedly. The significance of this poetic technique in this poem is “assurance”. The speaker wants the reader to believe that you really don’t have to make yourself suffer.

Alliteration is the repetition of words beginning from the same letter. A poet can use this technique for two or multiple words to make the tone rhythmic. In Wild Geese, the poet uses alliteration in two instances. In the eleventh and twelfth lines, we notice mountains and meanwhile to be alliterations. Following this high and heading home is another use of alliteration.

Half rhymes are another poetic technique that is used to give a subtle rhythm to the poem. The poet uses this technique in several lines with the words rains and prairies, exciting and things.

Anaphora or repetition is somewhat similar. The difference between the two is that the technique repetition means repetition of any word. Anaphora is the repetition of a word or a cluster of words at the beginning of lines. Such as “you do not have to” and “meanwhile” in the poem is an excellent example of anaphora.

Enjambment is the quick transition of incomplete sentences. The poetic technique does not give the reader time to register one line and quickly jumps to another. This technique is a primary contributor to the thrill in a poem. We can witness the use of enjambment in lines eight, nine, sixteen and seventeen.

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver Summary

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver Breakdown Analysis

Line 1-3

You do not have to be good.

You do not have to walk on your knees

for a hundred miles through the desert repenting.

The first three lines of the poem tell the reader to not strive towards retention. The poet says you do not have to be good or best. You do not have to give yourself pain and walk on your knees for a hundred miles in a desert because some source demands you to repent. The poet wants the reader to be carefree and liberated of the notion of perfection.

Line 4-5

You only have to let the soft animal of your body

love what it loves.

The poet, through these lines, preaches to the reader that you have to let your soul love what it wants to love. The poet wishes the reader to be unapologetic and fearless in loving what he/she wants to love. The poet means that you don’t have to strive towards perfection but love what you want to love.

Line 6-11

Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.

Meanwhile, the world goes on.

Meanwhile, the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain

are moving across the landscapes,

over the prairies and the deep trees,

the mountains and the rivers.

The poet wants you to speak about your sorrows to her, and she will talk hers to you. The poet urges you to realize that the world is going on with its beauty while you are speaking your despairs. The world is making every arrangement to make things fall into place. While you talk, the sun and the pebbles of the rain are moving across the beautiful landscapes.

The sun and raindrops are moving over the prairies and the deep forests, the mountains and the rivers. The world is moving on with time.

Line 12-13

Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,

are heading home again.

While the reader converses his/her despairs to the poet, the landscapes are changing, and the wild geese are returning back home after having a day. The poet uses the reference of a wild bird who is going back home, indicating that winter is gone. It’s the season of autumn and happiness.

The poet wants the reader to feel happy and assured that all your despairs would be gone one day. Nothing lasts long.

Line 14-18

Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,

the world offers itself to your imagination,

calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting –

over and over announcing your place

in the family of things.

The poet says that it doesn’t matter who you are, where you come from or what you do and how lonely are you; the world offers its wonders to you in the most unexpected and exciting ways. The world calls to you loudly like a wild goose, over and over again. The world lets you know your place in the family no matter who and how you are.

Thus, through this poem, the poet wants the readers to know that pain and despair are temporary. You, the reader, do not have to punish yourself for your pain and troubles. You must let yourself grief as long as you want to. As you grieve, the world moves on and creates its special beauty for you in the form of nature.

In the end, everything will fall into place, and you will see the beauty of this world through its blooming clouds, trees, mountains and birds.

Wild Geese by Mary Oliver Historical Context

No significant historical context can be seen in this poem. The poem is a philosophical and free verse text that reminds readers of how beautiful the world is.

However, the poem was reproduced in 2004 when America had just suffered from the rages of war and violence. As Mary Oliver was born in 1935, she was a witness to the environmentalist revolution when people started to realize that nature is essential to exist. Instead, human beings and nature must co-exist to maintain harmony and balance.

This era of accepting nature as an essential part of survival is considered to be the inspiration for Oliver’s literary pieces. Most of Oliver’s poems are rich with references to the natural elements of this world and its beauty. Through her poetry, she inspires and urges humanity to experience nature as much as they can, for it is the only truth that delivers peace,

Cinderella by Anne Sexton | Summary, Analysis, Stanzas and Meaning

Anne Sexton Cinderella Analysis

Anne Sexton Cinderella Analysis: The poem “Cinderella”, authored by Anne Sexton, is a retelling of the classic fairy tale. Anne Sexton’s fifth book of poems, Transformations, consists entirely of all repurposed children’s tales.

Mostly known for her first-person confessional style (she’s often compared to Sylvia Plath), Sexton’s “Cinderella” might seem totally different in subject matter from a lot of her other work.

However, it still has a close, talkative style and darkness of theme that is the hallmark of Sexton’s work. “Cinderella” is a retelling of the fairy tale’s Grimms’ version—not Disney’s.

Even though this poem is somewhat different from the work for which the poet is best known, careful readers can still find the dark, emotional, and feminist elements which make Sexton one of the best poets of the 20th century.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

Anne Sexton Cinderella Summary

The poem “Cinderella” begins with a series of small “example” stories about lucky people who go from being in unfortunate circumstances to becoming very wealthy through some instance of luck, by winning the sweepstakes, or collecting on insurance, or becoming the love object of royalty.

From there, the poet moves on to the actual story of Cinderella. The story revolves around the Grimms’ version of the tale. After her mother’s death, Cinderella is relegated to being a housemaid by her evil stepmother and stepsisters.

Her father lavishes his stepdaughters with beautiful gifts, whereas he brings Cinderella only a twig. Cinderella places the twig on her mother’s grave, and it grows into a magical tree on which a magical dove sits. Anytime Cinderella wants something, she only asks for it, and the dove throws it down to her.

In Sexton’s version of the tale, as in the Grimms’, the famous Prince’s ball is a three-day-long event, and Cinderella gets dresses and shoes from the dove for all three event nights.

On the final night of the event, the Prince gets tired of not knowing where his beloved has gone and covers his palace’s steps with wax. As she’s running off the ball on the last night, Cinderella’s shoe gets stuck, leaving the Prince with his important piece of evidence.

In trying to find the woman who will fit into the shoe, the Prince (as portrayed in the Disney version) comes to Cinderella’s house. The stepsisters attempt to get their feet into the shoe. Contrary to the Disney version, in the Grimm or Sexton version, each sister cuts off a part of Cinderella’s foot to fit it into the shoe.

The blood that pours out of the shoe gives her away. Cinderella, in the end, tries on the shoe, it fits without any bloodletting, and she gets married to the Prince. At the wedding ceremony, the dove pecks out the stepsisters’ eyes. The Prince and Cinderella then live happily ever after, as portrayed in the poem.

Anne Sexton Cinderella Analysis Themes

Anne Sexton Cinderella Themes

Women and Femininity 

Anne Sexton Cinderella Feminist, The narrator of the poem “Cinderella” has an extremely dim view of certain tendencies of women. Between the nursemaid who uses her looks to get ahead, Cinderella uses the white dove to marry the prince.

The stepsisters’ gruesome acts of self-mutilation—all done to get a husband—the narrator paints a super-cynical view of femininity and womanhood.

Anne Sexton, like Sylvia Plath, had tortured relationships with gender, gender roles, and the place of women in society, so this theme crops up not only in “Cinderella,” but in a ton of Sexton’s work.

Women are showcased as foolish, superficial, and single-minded in this poem. The way the narrator snidely makes fun of the women in “Cinderella” shows us that she doesn’t think women should be like this.

Wealth 

The entire poem of “Cinderella” pivots on the idea of wealth. Also, women’s pursuit of wealth is the main thematic element of the literary piece. The example “Cinderella stories” all involve cold, hard, and Cinderella get to the ball by way of having beautiful, presumably pricey clothing, even though she manages to get it magically and for free.

When the stepsisters are given riches and jewels, Cinderella gets a twig, signifying that her life is miserable. Getting married to the prince is of utmost importance to everyoneand not, according to the poem, because the prince is handsome.

Being married to a prince has almost always been associated with having all kinds of dollar, dollar bills — not necessarily being married to someone you actually love. So throughout “Cinderella,” the theme of wealth is used to illustrate how incredibly superficial people can be and the crazy things that money propels some people to do.

The Supernatural Power

In the poem “Cinderella,” the magical tree and bird are Cinderella’s magical friends. Supposedly she’s a “good” and “devout” girl, so maybe she deserved this supernatural help.

However, Cinderella would have been nothing in this poem without the constant help of magic. The poem uses the supernatural power as a kind of extended metaphor for how frustrating Cinderella stories are. Practically everything is being handed to the heroine with no work involved on her part.

Good vs Evil 

Almost every fairy tale involves a fight between good and evil, and this one is no exception. The interesting part about how Sexton retells the story is that it’s not quite clear in “Cinderella” that the title character is outstanding.

She’s certainly not bad, but she’s also kind of passive. She doesn’t really do anything throughout the entire story. We get no character development for her. It’s just that her mom passes away, she has a magical tree, and she’s been wronged by her stepfamily.

On the other hand, the prince isn’t portrayed as exactly charming either. So while “good” wins out at the end, one of the important questions in the poem has to do with what “good” and “bad” really are in fairy tales.

The poem might also suggest that it must be re-evaluated what makes a protagonist “the good guy” in many of our favourite childhood stories.

Good Fortune 

The poem “Cinderella” bubbles with sarcastic anger, a bitterness regarding people who get something for nothing. It is what everyone wants — to win the lottery, to marry a rich person, and never to have to worry about money or bills again.

Cinderella has been blessed with one good fortune after another, aided by her magical tree and bird. The most significant examples of the speaker’s annoyance towards Cinderella stories come initially, with a short little example of people who happen to have stumbled into their wealth through certain circumstance just barely under their control.

What the poem wants to tell the readers is that our notions of luck and fortune are misguided. Even having everything we want does not guarantee that we’ll be happy or even really alive.

Anne Sexton Cinderella Analysis

“Cinderella”, authored by Anne Sexton, retells the traditional version of the fairy tale but gives it a sarcastic twist. The poem appears in Transformations, which is a collection of poems in which the speaker, introduced in the first poem, “The Gold Key,” is a “middle-aged witch” and author of “tales/ which transform the Brothers Grimm.”

As fitting with oral storytelling, the speaker opens the poem with a direct address to the reader and undermined Cinderella’s rags-to-riches story in four short stanzas which give examples of modern success stories:

  • The nursemaid marries her employer’s son.
  • The plumber “who wins the Irish Sweepstakes.”
  • The charwoman who collects the insurance from an accident.
  • The milkman is able to make his fortune in real estate.

Three of the examples are followed by the sarcastic abstain “That story,” which mocks the happy ending of this fairy tale and perhaps its hopeful readers as well.

Anne Sexton Cinderella Stanzas

The following six stanzas retell Grimm’s tale keeping faithful with its details for the most part. However, the narrator’s occasional observations tell readers to pay attention to an essential part of the story or comment on the characters or plot.

In the fifth as well as sixth verses of this poem, Cinderella becomes a maid to her stepmother and stepsisters and plants a twig, given to her by her father, on the grave of her mother. On the tree which grows from the twig rests a dove who grants all of Cinderella’s wishes.

The sixth and seventh verses continue with the familiar story. When Cinderella has to pick a bowl of lentils out of the ashes before she can go to the ball, the white dove comes to her rescue. The dove not only picks up the lentils but also provides her with a golden gown and slippers that match.

The prince dances only with her during the event. The poem continues in the next three verses to describe the prince’s escorting Cinderella home, where she disappears into the pigeon-house, until the fateful third day when, by covering the palace steps with wax, the prince successfully captures Cinderella’s slipper.

When the prince comes looking for Cinderella and decides he would marry the girl whose feet fit into the slipper, the eldest stepsister cuts off her toe, and the youngest one her heel so that they can fit into the slipper and thus win the prince.

However, in each case, the dove alerts the prince about the trail of blood which gives away the sisters’ move. At last, the prince puts the shoe on Cinderella, and she fits into it. The stepsisters attend their royal wedding, where the avenging dove pecks out their eyes.

In the concluding verse of the poem, which echoes the tone and structure of the opening stanzas, the narrator reveals that “Cinderella and the prince/ lived, they say, happily ever after,” ending the poem with the sardonic refrain “That story.”

Anne Sexton Cinderella Analysis Meaning

Although the poems included in ‘Transformations’ are a departure from the confessional mode for which Sexton is so well known. Several poems in this collection, including “Cinderella,” are, like the confessional poems, concerned with family and relationships issues between the sexes.

The dark humour and structure of “Cinderella,” as well as its contrast between the magical details of fairy tales and the mundane realities of daily life, are characteristic of the poems in ‘Transformations’, which show the influence of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud as well as feminism.

“Cinderella,” particularly, pokes fun at the willingness of believing in the lucky break, which will transform ordinary life, as well as the willingness to idealising love and marriage. The fairy tale’s happy ending is depicted as insignificant and stultifying, an emotional and psychological death.

However, by inference, actual married life fares no better. Petty annoyances and quarrels characterise it as the once-young married couple becomes overweight and middle-aged.

The poem explores the tension between the ever-popular Cinderella tale and reality. In the experienced and cynical middle-aged witch’s personality, Sexton enters the debate on marriage and the relationship between women and men, encouraging readers to view the marriage plot with a mixture of scepticism and humour.

AnneSexton Cinderella Analysis

Anne Sexton Cinderella Analysis Symbols

Dove 

Traditionally doves are symbols of goodness, peace, and divine blessing. With their white colour and ability to fly, they are the animal kingdom’s angels. The poem is a white dove – white symbolising innocence and purity – which perches on the tree which has grown on Cinderella’s mother’s grave.

The dove magically steps into Cinderella’s life not only to grant her wishes but to make sure that she marries the prince. After all, the white dove points out to the unaware prince that the woman he intends to marry had to cut off part of her foot to make the shoe fit.

The dove is the illustration of Cinderella’s mother’s supernatural intervention in her daughter’s life. However, its presence in the Grimm story and Sexton’s poem calls the traditional symbol of associating a dove into question.

Both mothers in this poem ultimately have the same goal – to make sure their daughters achieve security by getting married to rich men. The dove, therefore, doesn’t fully symbolise peace and blessing for Cinderella in this poem.

An eternally pasted-on smile seems slightly better than abuse and servitude, but the speaker is sceptical about Cinderella’s future happiness in her marriage. The speaker’s doubt clouds the dove’s traditional meanings of peace and blessing. The dove, in the end, violently blinds the stepsisters as if to underscore this point.

A Beautiful Dress

All Cinderella needs to get married to a rich husband, it seems, is a beautiful dress. As the poem portrays, clearly, the prince would not have even considered her a possible match if she had arrived at the event dressed in her everyday clothing. She needed to have certain clothes and a certain look that signalled she was worthy of a prince’s attention.

The dress symbolises the fundamental classism (prejudice against a certain social class) present in the Cinderella story. It also symbolises how women are objectified and not seen as individuals but as frames to put beautiful clothing.

The prince charming fails at recognising the women he allows to try on the shoe. He has to devise the shoe scheme as he doesn’t actually see women as individuals

Readers often wonder if the prince would have paid any mind to Cinderella if not for the dress. The answer to that would be no. As a woman, Cinderella’s fabricated appearance is by far the most important thing about her.

The Golden Shoe 

The golden shoe symbolises the lengths to which women have been expected and pressured to “fit” into some predetermined mould of acceptability and availability. It is the device allowing Cinderella to escape her circumstances and marry the prince.

However, it also provides a gory detail of what a woman will go through to please a man – and is expected to go through to please a man. The eldest stepsister cuts off a toe to fit in the shoe without any second thought.

The other stepsister cuts off her heel, again without any fuss. These are the normal behaviours of a woman who wants to catch a husband, as showcased in the poem.

The shoe is also, however, a symbol of justice.

The poem says the stepsisters were pretty enough and “had lovely feet.” But the shoe doesn’t fit; it is not their fate to marry the prince. Instead, the same magical dove manifesting Cinderella’s wishes doles out punishment to the stepsisters for their wickedness. Their self-mutilation is pointless, and Cinderella gets a little bit of revenge.

Poems About The Holocaust | List of 9 Poems About Holocaust

Poems About The Holocaust

Emotional Poems About The Holocaust: The poems included in the following list have been written from various perspectives, and they explain the tragedies and experiences of the affected ones during the Holocaust. These poems depict the guilt, fear, hope and memory of the ones who were lost and those who survived during this occurrence.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

List of 9 Poems About Holocaust

The famous Holocaust poems included in the list are:

  • First They Came by Martin Neimöller
  • Death Fugue by Paul Celan
  • Do not stand at my grave and weep by Mary Elizabeth Frye
  • Never shall I Forget by Elie Wiesel
  • A Poor Christian Looks at the Ghetto by CzeławMiłosz
  • The Survivor by Primo Levi
  • The Butterfly by Pavel Friedmann
  • Fear by Eva Picková
  • September Song by Geoffrey Hill

First They Came by Martin Neimöller

This is the poetic form of a post-war confession by German Lutheran pastor Martin Neimöller. The themes of guilt, persecution and responsibility have been highlighted in this poem through the German confession. The poem portrays the cowardice of particular sections of the German population during the second world war as the Nazis were eradicating people from their own country.

The poet includes himself in that group when he was captivated and sent to Dachau by the Nazis. Later on, after the war, he became the German people’s voice demanding peace in the post-war scenario. This poem is a concession speech that he delivered in 1946 at the Confessing Church in Frankfurt.

Death Fugue by Paul Celan

Written in 1945, this poem was titled ‘Todesfuge’ in German, and Fugue is a type of musical composition where one or more voices occur simultaneously throughout the poem. This is a thirty-six long poem based on the camps and the Final Solution. This poem speaks of many emotions, mainly love, fear and pain.

Paul Celan, a prisoner himself, very beautifully portrays the emotions and experiences of the others as he has observed during the war. The poem depicts the love for a family member who was killed or captivated. It also metaphorically speaks of the fear of a commandant who apparently “plays with snakes” but dreads the war’s terror.

Lastly, the poem portrays the intense pain, misery and unwillingness of the captives to survive. This is a thirty-six long poem based on the camps and the Final Solution.

Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep by Mary Elizabeth Frye

Although the poem’s background is not very clear, it is generally thought that this poem was written in 1932, before the darkest time of the Holocaust in Germany. This period is considered the era of growing antisemitism in Germany.

The poet speaks of death in a welcoming tone as she comforts people who will mourn her demise. She has seen death not just as an end to life but also as a beginning. She had taken inspiration from the life and hardship of a young Jewish woman, Margaret Schwarzkopf, who could not return to Germany to see her mother before she passed away.

Never Shall I Forget by Elie Wiesel

This poem is a part of Wiesel’s memoir ‘Night’, where he recounts his experience of the first night in a camp in Birkenau. The poet deflects from his general writing style and writes about this particular night’s experience, which has changed his life forever.

He has used multiple repetitions, seven times to be exact, to intensify the pictures of the smoke, the stillness and the silence. Of the lines, most important is: “Never shall I forget those moments that murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to ashes”. This reflects his trauma and experience of that night that has led to his transformation as a whole.

A Poor Christian Looks at the Ghetto by CzeławMiłosz

This is a famous poem by the Nobel Prize winner CzeławMiłosz where the poet depicts the condition of the Warsaw Ghetto after being demolished by the Germans. Particularly, the first two stanzas reflect the destruction of the ghetto, depicted with natural images implying a dark and complex history.

The speaker portrays the collapsed walls and roofs as the houses were burnt and only a leafless tree remains. The poem also speaks about ‘Patriarch’ as the ‘guardian mole’ finding its way between the corpses. The poem has been narrated through the experience of a survivor who is a ‘Jew of the New Testament’. He blames himself as he sees the heinous scene of corpses and the destructed Ghetto.

The Survivor by Primo Levi

Primo Levi, best known for his short stories collection, The Periodic Tablespeaks about his experiences in the concentration camps and his survival. He was a part of the Italian resistance and was arrested along with the comrades and was sent to an internment camp.

The poet remembers his “companions’ faces” as they are darkened by uneasy sleepless nights and the fear of death. He expresses deep guilt over his own survival and mourns for lost who tried to find peace.

The Butterfly by Pavel Friedmann

Pavel Friedmann wrote this poem at the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1942. The poet later died in Auschwitz in 1944. In the poem, he describes the “last” butterfly and its movements through the air. It symbolises life, freedom, and hope. The yellow colour of its wings is used as a contrast against the darkness.

The poet depicts the fear and terror of the new world that he has found himself in. Living in a ghetto in Nazi Germany, the speaker has seen his last butterfly, symbolising freedom loss. The poet finds darkness all around him.

Fear by Eva Picková

One of the lesser-known poems on this list, ‘Fear’, was written by Eva Picková, a twelve-year-old girl from Nymburk as she experiences the dreadful holocaust. She was deported to a Nazi concentration camp in 1942 and died in Auschwitz just over a year later.

The poet speaks about the impact of typhus on her community for the ones she cares for as she sees them suffering and dying around her. The poem reflects the terror and the fear that she regularly experiences in the detention camp.

In the third stanza, she considers whether it would be better to die than to continue on this way but quickly changes her mind decides that she, along with her friends and family, needs to make the world a better place. The poet reflects upon death, fear, family and requests God to save her loved ones.

September Song by Geoffrey Hill

‘September Song’ is a haunting poem written in the form of a sonnet and depicts a young child’s death, whose birth and death dates begin the poem. The poem does not have a rhyme theme or metrical pattern. Here the poet laments the loss, memory and terror that went around in Germany during the time of the Nazis.

The poet has used enough allusions and imageries like marching, military night, memory. The lines imply the difficulty of the poet who has faced all these events during the Holocaust.

List of 9 Poems About Holocaust

Where The Sidewalk Ends Summary by Shel Silverstein | Summary, Structure, Literary Devices and Stanzas

Where The Sidewalk Ends Summary

Where The Sidewalk Ends Poems Summary: Sheldon Allan Silverstein was born during the Great Depression into an immigrant Jewish family in Chicago on September 25, 1930. He was popularly known as Shel Silverstein.

He started writing and doodling from a very young age. He was a cartoonist, playwright, poet, performer, and recording artist.

“Giving Tree”, published in 1964, is Silverstein’s first major work and the best-known title. The book describes the relationship between a boy and a tree. It has been translated into various languages. As late as 2013, it ranked third on a Goodreads list of “Best Children’s Books.”

“Where the Sidewalk Ends”, published in 1974, is a collection of poems dealing with many common childhood concerns. The National Education Association added the book in the “Teachers Top 100 Books for Children” after a vote organized in 2007. Its audio version was released in 1983.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

In 1984, Shel Silverstein won the Grammy Award for Best Recording For Children for the audio version of ‘Where the Sidewalk Ends’. It was released on a cassette version in 1983 and as an LP phonograph record in 1984.

In 1991, Silverstein was nominated for Oscar Award for his song ‘I’m Checkin’ Out’, which he had written for the 1990 film, ‘Postcards from the Edge’.

Shel Silverstein has earned a cult status in terms of children’s poetry. It is not only the children who love Uncle Shel; the adults equally love and admire his work.

Silverstein died of a heart attack either on May 9 or May 10, 1999, in Key West, Florida. His housekeepers found his body on May 10, and he might have died the day before. He is buried in Westlawn Cemetery in Norridge, Illinois.

He illustrated his books. They are characterized by a skilled mixing of the sly and the serious, the macabre and the silly. Readers of all age groups admire his unique imagination and bold brand of humour.

In the year 2002, he was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and, in 2014, into the Chicago Literary Hall of Fame.

Where the Sidewalk Ends Summary

The poem is set in two different backdrops. The first part of the poem reflects a place where a sidewalk ends. This place is the embodiment of beauty, untouched by the side effects of human civilization.

The latter part of the poem speaks about a place surrounded by black smoke and pollution harrows. The poet urges us to leave this doomed place and follow the children’s path to find a more peaceful place.

The mention of the angelic children guiding us towards beautiful nature is more inclined towards the notions of spirituality and soulfulness than just the physical phase of life. The poet desires the readers to gain freedom from greed and selfishness, accept innocence, love, and peace towards leading a happy and pure life.

This poem can be perceived as a transition between childhood and adulthood. Adulthood can be held synonymous to the latter place described in the poem- filled with obstacles.

The initial part of the poem is similar to the childhood of a person- sprawling with innocence.

Where the Sidewalk Ends Structure

The poem is written in three stanzas. The first stanza has six lines. The second stanza similarly consists of six lines. The third stanza is comparatively small, with only four lines.

The poem follows a rhymic scheme of the pattern AABCCD, ABCCDB, AABC.

The poet wrote the poem with a dactylic dimeter. A dactylic dimeter means that each line has two feet.

Summary of Where the Sidewalk Ends

Where the Sidewalk Ends Literary Devices

Alliteration is the recurrence of the same consonant sounds at the beginning of words close to each other. This repetition of sounds brings attention to the lines in which it is used and creates a more aural beat.

We can see the employment of alliteration in the lines “We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow” with an emphasis on the letter “w”. The line “Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black” also features alliteration.

Repetition has been used throughout the poem. The phrase “where the sidewalk ends” has been used greatly in the entire poem. The use of repetition highlights the meaning of the poem.

Another literary device he uses is imagery. Imagery engages human senses to deepen the reader’s understanding of the work. It uses the senses to create a vivid image in the reader’s mind.

The description of the grass or the sunlight employs a strong use of imagery. The “peppermint wind” influences our olfactory senses.

Detailed Analysis of Where the Sidewalk Ends

Stanza one

“There is a place where the sidewalk ends

And before the street begins,

And there the grass grows soft and white,

And there the sun burns crimson bright,

And there the moon-bird rests from his flight

To cool in the peppermint wind.”

These lines give an eye-soothing and mesmerizing image of an ideal place. The lines speak of a place surrounded by the beauty of nature and untouched by pollution.

The place is located at the end of a sidewalk and the beginning of a street. It is the meeting grounds of the sidewalk and the street.

The grass that grows there is “soft and white,” which implies its surreal setting. The word “white” has been used to highlight the similarities between this perfectly peaceful place and heaven.

Since normally grasses are not white, this can also be seen as an attempt to create a romantic place in the reader’s mind.

The crimson beams of the sun fall here and make it bright. The moon birds rest here in the cooling surrounding of the peppermint wind.

The place is a fragment of the imagination of the poet and can not be found physically. It is a place which one can resort to escape from the daily mundane life.

Stanza Two

“Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black

And the dark street winds and bends.

Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow

We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow,

And watch where the chalk-white arrows go

To the place where the sidewalk ends.”

These lines describe a dark place which is an aftereffect of industrial pollution. This place is filled with black smoke, which makes this place extremely unwelcoming and toxic to live in. It is not filled with youthfulness and is dull and dark.

The place is the exact opposite of the place described earlier. The flowers that grow here are “asphalt”, which indicates the decay taking place here.

The description here points to a more real and practical world. One can use the word “pits” to understand the depths of how bad the situation has grown due to pollution.

The poet asks the audience to leave this doomed place and head towards the sidewalk’s end, which promises a more peaceful life. This place is the embodiment of a ruined and cursed scenario with not even an inch of a place left to breathe fresh air.

The transition between the places can also be seen as a change from childhood and adulthood. Adulthood life is full of hardships, like the place with black smoke.

Childhood life is innocent and more carefree, like the place marked by the end of the sidewalk. It did not have any responsibilities to shoulder.

Hence, the sidewalk represents a mundane life filled with obstacles, and the end of the sidewalk is a place flourishing with nature.

The phrase “walk that is measured and slow” emphasizes that every step in adult life needs to be measured and well thought of. Adult life comes with a lot of responsibilities which demands slow and measured steps throughout.

However, there is always a scope to leave behind this life and follow the “chalk-white arrows” and embark on the different unexplored aspects of life.

Stanza Three

Yes, we’ll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,

And we’ll go where the chalk-white arrows go,

For the children, they mark, and the children, they know

The place where the sidewalk ends.”

The children are the purest souls who are instructed by their innocence and are the only ones aware of the “place where the sidewalk ends.” The poet urges the audience to follow their trail and go to that place.

Children have been referred to hereto as representing the innocence and the essence of good. It is much needed to guide us through our life and help us survive all the difficulties and hardships at every stage of life. The poet believes that we want to be as happy and real as children at the end of the tunnel.

Children are unaware of the serious issues of life and enjoy every little moment of it. They do not have any complexities and have a pure heart.

The poet believes that if we live life through a child’s eyes, we will enjoy the better things life gives us than lament over the small losses we encounter each day. We should, at the time, leave behind the grave issues of life and indulge in some light living.

One can always escape from the brutalities of adult life and plunge into the childlike innocence one has. The escape helps us to forget worldly issues and relish the pleasure of life.

We should always cherish the small bits and flashes of our life and. There is no harm in embracing the inside child, which eventually gets lost under society’s huge pressure.

Although the poem is written for kids, it holds for the adults also.

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis by William Wordsworth | Summary, Analysis, Structure and Literary Devices

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis: On April 7, 1770, William Wordsworth was born in Cockermouth, Cumberland, located in the Lake District of England. This place is connected with much of his work.

Wordsworth’s mother passed away when he was very young, at the age of eight—this experience moulds much of his later work. William Wordsworth was one of the founding fathers of English Romanticism.

Romanticism was the liberation from those rules. It delivered the poets the liberty to write about what they feel, according to their own directions, without influence. Much like impressionism in painting, Romanticism honoured and praised emotions and imagination. It was the free-flowing motion of one’s love towards anything.

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

He is recognized as a spiritual and epistemological speculation poet, focusing on the human relationship with nature. He was an ardent pioneer of using the vocabulary and speech patterns of common people in poetry.

Wordsworth developed a love of nature as a young man, a theme reflected in many of his poems. In 1842, he was granted a government pension, and the following year he became poet laureate.

Wordsworth’s most famous and noteworthy work, “The Prelude” (Edward Moxon, 1850), is considered by many to be perhaps the crowning achievement of English Romanticism.

The poem, revised numerous times, chronicles the poet’s spiritual life and paves the way for the birth of a new poetry genre. Although he worked on the poem for a long time, it was released after his death.

Wordsworth spent the final years of his life in Rydal Mount in England, travelling and continuing his outdoor excursions. He was devastated by his daughter Dora’s death in 1847 and lost his intention to write poems.

William Wordsworth passed away at Rydal Mount on April 23, 1850, leaving his wife Mary to publish The Prelude three months later his death.

Background of Daffodils – I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud Theme

In his collection of poems, the composition Daffodils – I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud was formerly published in “Poems in Two Volumes” in 1807, by the name “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth. A revised version was published in 1815.

It is an iconic English poem of the Romantic Genre. Later it was popularly referred to as Daffodils.

Wordsworth penned the poem after he came across a “crowd” of daffodils along the shore of a lake while walking with his sister, Dorothy, near his home in the Lake District of England. William Wordsworth created the poem in 1804, but the circumstantial walk took place on April 15 1802.

Dorothy called that day to be a stormy one, and hence there were a lot of waves in the sea and dancing daffodils. This was the inspiration behind the poem, which we can understand quite well throughout the poem.

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis by William Wordsworth

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Summary

It is one of the most renowned poems by the poet. The poem is about a random encounter the poet has with a valley of daffodils.

The daffodils are mesmerizing and have caught the poet’s attention. The daffodils leave an everlasting impression on the poet.

He is not only startled by them at that moment; he remembers them in his secluded moments of loneliness. It is a quintessentially Romantic poem, bringing together key ideas about imagination and how natural beauty impacts humanity.

Although the poet embarks on the fact that he is lonely, the meeting with the daffodils unites him with nature and creates a feeling of togetherness. The memory of the daffodils is etched deep in the poet’s heart.

Thus we can draw an inference that nature has the ability to influence the mind of a human being deeply. The poem talks about the positive impact nature can have on human lives and how it can be the key to living a happy life.

The rustic beauty throughout the poem has been drawing the attention of all the readers throughout every generation. The lucid language is easy to comprehend, and hence the poem is readily relinquished to all audience.

Structure of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis

It consists of four stanzas of six lines each which makes the entire poem of 24 lines long.

The rhyming scheme followed for each stanza is the quatrain-couplet rhyme scheme of ABABCC. The first (A) and the second (B) lines rhyme with the third (A) and the fourth (B), respectively, i.e., there is an alternate rhyming pattern. These are succeeded by a rhyming couplet (CC).

Each line is metered in iambic tetrameter, which means there are four feet in each line.

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis Literary Devices

Personification is very evident throughout the entire course of the poem. Personification is enriching an inanimate object with human-like characteristics.

In the lines “Fluttering and dancing in the breeze” and “Tossing their heads in sprightly dance”, the daffodils have been personified where they are dancing like humans.

Hyperbole is the use of exaggeration as a speech figure to highlight the importance of the situation. The phrase “Ten thousand saw I at a glance” uses hyperbole to point to the daffodils’ vast expansive range.

A simile compares two entities by using words such as “like” and “as”. The line “lonely as a cloud” depicts the similarity between the poet and a floating cloud. The phrase “Continuous as the stars” equates the stars with the daffodils in their numbers.

Assonance is the reiteration of the vowel sound in the same lines of a poem. An example in the poem would be, “They stretched in never-ending.”

Alliteration is the repetition of the consonant sound in a single line of the poem. An example in the poem would be “I gazed and gazed,” with the sound of “G” repeated.

Summary of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis

Detailed Analysis of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis

Stanza one:

I wandered lonely as a cloud —

That floats on high o’er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”

The poet recollected an instance when he was walking in solitude along a valley. He was in a melancholic mood. He compares himself to a cloud that floats aimlessly.

All of a sudden, he witnessed a long and bustling row of daffodils. The use of words like “crowd” and “host” clarifies that the daffodils were in huge numbers.

He further describes that the daffodils were located beside a lake and below the trees. The soft breeze made them dance and sway in their tune.

The sight of the daffodils had an emotional shift on the poet, and his mood lightened.

Stanza Two:

“Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the Milky Way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.”

The poet compares the daffodils to the twinkling belt of luminous stars in the night sky. Their enormity and brilliance are synonymous with that of the Milky Way.

The poet perceives how the flowers appear to go on without end, alongside a bay swaying in the breeze.

The speaker believes almost ten thousand or so daffodils dance cheerfully with high energy to the gliding breeze. It is a sight to behold.

Stanza Three:

“The waves beside them danced, but they

Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:

A Poet could not but be gay,

In such a jocund company:

I gazed—and gazed—but little thought

What wealth the show to me had brought:”

The waves in the bay were moving with joy. The beautiful daffodils outshone the dance of the waves. They seemed to be bubbling with happiness, and this delight seemed to reach the poet.

The poet was overjoyed with the company of the daffodils and could not be any happier. He contemplated their beauty for a long time without realizing how fast time was fleeting away. The daffodils’ attractive vision made time stop for the poet as he was lost in their beauty.

Although he did not realize the enriching experience he was gaining at that moment, he cherished it after some time. The visual extravaganza initially does not make him realize its value. However, he does apprehend its significance both as a source of inspiration for his poetry and spiritual well-being.

Stanza Four:

For oft, when on my couch I lie

In vacant or in pensive mood,

They flash upon that inward eye

Which is the bliss of solitude;

And then my heart with pleasure fills,

And dances with the daffodils.”

The poet embarks upon how the daffodils have earned an everlasting place in his mind. Whenever he is lying leisurely on his couch, the thought of the startling image of the daffodils makes him drift from his solitude into a happy mood.

He expressly affirms that his heart fills with satisfaction and pleasure whenever he remembers the daffodils’ amiable, happy-go-lucky dance. Through the powers of his vision, he can join the daffodils as they dance and sway in the tunes of the breeze.