The Ant and the Cricket Summary Analysis and Explanation

Students can also check the English Summary to revise with them during exam preparation.

The Ant and the Cricket Summary Analysis and Explanation

About the Poet Aesop

Poet Name Aesop
Born 620 BC, Mesembria
Died 564 BC, Delphi, Greece
Nationality Greek
Movies The Tortoise and the Hare, Grasshopper and the Ants

The Ant and the Cricket Introduction

Aesop is a legendary figure the supposed author of a collection of Greek fables, including those produced by Demetrius Phalareus in the 4th century. Legendary figure Aesop is presumed to have been born around 600 B.C. and is the supposed author of a collection of Greek fables.

Various attempts were made in ancient times to establish him as an actual personage. He was most likely to provide an author for fables centering on the beast, so that “a story of Aesop” become synonymous with “fable”.

A fable is a story, often with animals as characters, that conveys a moral. This poem about an ant and a cricket contains an idea of far-reaching significance, which is as true of a four-legged cricket as of a two-legged one.

Some human beings are like the cricket, who save nothing for the bad weather. And, therefore, the tale is not a fable but the truth.

The Ant and the Cricket Summary of the Poem

The poem “The Ant and the Cricket” is a fable (a story, consisting of animals as characters, that conveys a moral) written in a poetic format. It is about a silly young cricket and a miser ant. The cricket used to sing all day long and enjoy his good times during the summer season.

He lacked farsightedness, for he never had plans for his future. When the winter arrived, cricket couldn’t find a small amount of food to eat. So the cricket thinks to go to ant to borrow food and to get shelter.

The Cricket knocked on the ant’s door asking to help. Then ant questioned the cricket what he was doing during summer. The poem ends with the ant asking the cricket to try dancing and singing again during his hard times.

Moral: We should work harder for our own sake and for the time of troubles. Moreover, always remembers that today’s saving is tomorrow’s income.

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