Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English First Flight

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Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Class 10 English First Flight

Part I. His First Flight

Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Question 1.
For how long had the seagull been alone?
Answer:
The seagull had been alone for twenty-four hours.

Question 2.
Why did the seagull not go with the rest of his family?
Answer:
The seagull did not go with the rest of his family because he was afraid to fly.

Question 3.
(i) What were the ways the seagull had thought of to join his family?
(ii) Did he try any one of them?
Answer:
(i) The seagull thought of joining his family without having to fly. He ran from one end of the ledge to the other. The ledge ended in a steep fall in precipice. He thought of walking upto them but there was a deep chasm between him and them.
(ii) No, he didn’t try anyone of them.

Question 4.
Did the seagull think the sea was like a land? Pick out the words from the text that suggest this.
Answer:
Yes, the seagull thought the sea was like a land. He landed on the sea. When his legs sank into it, he screamed with fear and tried to rise again flapping his wings. This clearly indicates that he thought the sea was like a land.

Question 5.
(i) When did the seagull’s flight begin?
(ii) Where did it end?
Answer:
(i)His flight began when he was falling outwards and downwards into space. His wings spread outwards. Now, he was not falling headlong. He was moving gradually downwards and outwards.
(ii) His flight ended floating on the sea.

Question 6.
When did the seagull get over his fear of the water?
Answer:
The seagull thought the sea was like a land. When he landed on the sea, his feet sank into it. He was seized with fear. He was too tired to rise again. His belly touched the water and he sank no further. Now, he was floating on the sea. He had got over his fear of the water.

Question 7.
Do you sympathise with the seagull? Give reasons.
Answer:
Flying is a natural instinct of birds. But the young seagull develops a fright of flight. We sympathise with him because he has to suffer a lot before he gets over his fear of flying. He has to bear the taunts of his family. He has to go without food for twenty-four hours.

Question 8.
How did the seagull express his excitement when he saw his mother bringing food for him?
Answer:
The seagull was very hungry. When he saw his mother bringing food for him, he was greatly excited. He expressed his excitement by uttering a joyful scream. He leaned out eagerly. He tapped the rock with his feet. He tried to get nearer to her as she flew across.

Question 9.
How did the young seagull’s parents teach him the art of flying?
Answer:
Birds have a natural instinct to fly. However, some birds, like the young seagull in the story are afraid to fly. Then their parents teach them how to fly. The seagull’s parents fly about with their children curveting and banking and soaring and diving and thus, perfecting them in the art of flying.

Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Why did the seagull’s father and mother threaten him and persuade him to fly? How did they do it? Do you think it is a good parenting? Should the parents threaten their wards for learning?
Answer:
The young seagull was scared to fly. He was afraid of the vast exposure of the sea beneath him. His siblings were courageous and had learnt to fly. His parents constantly encouraged him to fly but he ‘ was too scared to fly. He was left alone without food. He was desperate with hunger. He expected his parents to feed him. But it was a threatening from them. He would die of hunger if he did not fly. The mother tempted him with a fish within his reach but not closer to him.

He ultimately fell to temptation and dived into the sea and finally succeeded. Yes, it was a good parenting. Parents should not pamper their kids by spoon feeding. They should make them independent. They should learn to do their work. Parents’ strictness in making a child learn a skill should not be taken as a threat. It is necessary and in favour of the child. In my opinion, without threat, the seagull would not have learnt to fly. He would have starved to death.

Question 2.
‘Spare the rod and spoil the child.’ Do you think the young seagull was not ready to fly due to lenient treatment by his family in the beginning? What made him fly later on? What is the role of motivation in learning?
Answer:
‘Spare the rod and spoil the child’. No, I don’t agree with this statement.No learning can take place under fear. It is the motivation that makes learning easy. The seagull was too scared to fly. It was a new thing for him. When he saw the vast sea, he could not take courage and fly. He was too young and was being taken care of by his parents. It was natural that his parents were feeding him. It can’t be called a lenient treatment.

He was, no doubt, threatened by his parents, but it was just to make him realise how important it was to fly. It was a question of his survival. The mother seagull tempted him with a piece of fish. He fell to temptation and dived into the vast sea. He was encouraged by his family and he learnt the art of flying. Motivation, encouragement and family support help in learning. The rod must be spared.

Question 3.
Fear and lack of confidence stop one from learning new things. Do you agree? How did these two traits of the young seagull make him coward? How did he overcome these shortcomings?
Answer:
Yes, it is true that fear and lack of confidence stop us from learning new things.
The young seagull lacked the value of courage and confidence in his character. He was the last member, in his family, to learn the art of flight. He was too scared to fly. His parents and other siblings encouraged him constantly. When it did not work, they scolded him for his cowardice. The mother seagull tricked him and tempted him with a piece of fish. He was kept hungry. His hunger and need for food forced him to dive into the sea.

Though he was not willing to learn the art of flying yet he was tricked by his family. Once he dived, his fear disappeared and he enjoyed his first flight.It is a fact that unless we try for something and overcome our fear we can’t learn anything. Confidence and motivation are two important traits that make any learning possible.

Question 4.
Does the situation of the young seagull arouse sympathy for him? Does sympathy always help? Do you think providing food to the young seagull out of sympathy would have helped him?
Answer:
The young seagull was afraid of flying. He thought that his wings could not support him. He pretended to be falling asleep and called his mother for food. He was hungry but could not muster the courage to jump down and fly. He was scared. All his family members had left him and taunted him for his cowardice. In fact, they wanted him to take his first flight. He should have overcome his fear of flight by now.

Yes, I sympathise with the seagull. It is not an easy task to take the first leap. One has to be confident and bold. All are not equally brave. The young seagull was ready to jump but he needed some time. Ultimately, he mustered the courage and overcame his fear of flight.

No, sympathy does not always help. It makes a person dependent. We should not give a fish to a hungry man out of sympathy, we should teach him how to catch a fish for food. If the young seagull had been provided food, he would never have learnt the art of flying. He would have become a crippled parasite on his family.

Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Reference-to-Context

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.
The young seagull was alone on his ledge. His two brothers and his sister had already flown away the day before. He had been afraid to fly with them. Somehow when he had taken a little run forward to the brink of the ledge and attempted to flap his wings he became afraid. The great expanse of sea stretched down beneath, and it was such a long way down — miles down.

(a) The young seagull was alone on his …..
Answer:
ledge

(b) The young seagull was frightened to fly with his brothers and sisters because he was ………… of the sea.
Answer:
afraid

(c) The young seagull was on the ledge because his mother had asked him to remain there. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the synonym of ‘edge’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘Brink’.

Question 2.
He felt certain that his wings would never support him; so he bent his head and ran away back to the little hole under the ledge where he slept at night. Even when each of his brothers and his little sister, whose wings were far shorter than his own, ran to the brink, flapped their wings, and flew away, he failed to muster up courage to take that plunge which appeared to him so desperate. His father and mother had come around calling to him shrilly, upbraiding him, threatening to let him starve on his ledge unless he flew away. But for the life of him he could not move.

(a) The young seagull ran away back to the little hole under the ………. where he slept at night.
Answer:
ledge

(b) His parents had come around calling to him shrilly, threatening him ……… on his ledge unless he flew away.
Answer:
starve

(c) For the life of him, the young seagull could not move as he was afraid of the sea. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the synonym of ‘gather’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘Muster up’.

Question 3.
That was twenty-four hours ago. Since then nobody had come near him. The day before, all day long, he had watched his parents flying about with his brothers and sister, perfecting them in the art of flight, teaching them how to skim the waves and how to dive for fish. He had, in fact, seen his older brother catch his first herring and devour it, standing on a rock, while his parents circled around raising a proud cackle. And all the morning the whole family had walked about on the big plateau midway down the opposite cliff taunting him with his cowardice.

(a) Twenty-four hours ago, seagull’s father and mother from him.
Answer:
had flown away

(b) The young seagull’s parents were flying with his brothers and sister, perfecting them in the
Answer:
art of flight

(c) The whole family had walked about on the big plateau midway down the opposite cliff praising the young seagull’s courage. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the words ‘the loud noise that a bird makes’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘cackle’.

Question 4.
The sun was now ascending the sky, blazing on his ledge that faced the south. He felt the heat because he had not eaten since the previous nightfall. He stepped slowly out to the brink of the ledge, and standing on one leg with the other leg hidden under his wing, he closed one eye, then the other, and pretended to be falling asleep. Still they took no notice of him. He saw his two brothers and his sister lying on the plateau dozing with their heads sunk into their necks. His father was preening the feathers on his white back.

(а) The young seagull felt the heat because he had not eaten since the previous
Answer:
Nightfall

(b) The young seagull saw his two brothers and sister lying on the ……….. dozing with their heads sunk into their necks.
Answer:
Plateau

(c) The young seagull stepped slowly out to the midway of the ledge and stood there constantly. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the synonym of ‘supposed’ from the extract.
Answer:
Pretended.

Question 5.
Only his mother was looking at him. She was standing on a little high hump on the plateau, her white breast thrust forward. Now and again, she tore at a piece of fish that lay at her feet and then scrapped each side of her beak on the rock. The sight of the food maddened him. How he loved to tear food that way, scrapping his beak now and again to whet it.

(a) The young seagull’s mother was standing on a little high on the plateau.
Answer:
Hump

(b) The sight of the food him.
Answer:
Maddened

(c) Now and again, the young seagull’s mother tore at a piece of fish that lay at her feet. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Give a synonym of ‘sharpen’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘Whet’

Question 6.
“Ga, ga, ga,” he cried begging her to bring him some food. “Gaw-col-ah,” she screamed back derisively. But he kept calling plaintively, and after a minute or so he uttered a joyful scream. His mother had picked up a piece of the fish and was flying across to him with it. He leaned out eagerly, tapping the rock with his feet, trying to get nearer to her as she flew across. But when she was just opposite to him, she halted, her wings motionless, the piece of fish in her beak almost within the reach of his beak. He waited a moment in surprise, wondering why she did not come nearer, and then, maddened by hunger, he dived at the fish.

(a) The seagull’s mother did not pay attention to his begging for food because she wanted him to ………. on his own.
Answer:
Fly

(b) The mother of the young seagull picked up a piece of the fish and with it.
Answer:
Flew

(c) Seeing his mother coming towards him with a fish, the young seagull tried to get nearer to her as she flew across. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word “sorrowfully” from the extract.
Answer:
‘Plaintively’.

Question 7.
With a loud scream he fell outwards and downwards into space. Then a monstrous terror seized him and his heart stood still. He could hear nothing. But it only lasted a minute. The next moment he felt his wings spread outwards. The wind rushed against his breast feathers, then under his stomach, and against his wings. He could feel the tips of his wings cutting through the air. He was not falling headlong now. He was soaring gradually downwards and outwards. He was no longer afraid. He just felt a bit dizzy.

(a) Maddened by the food brought by his mother, the young seagull ………… into the sea.
Answer:
Dived

(b) When the young seagull dived into the sea for the first time, his parents to motivate him.
Answer:
Screamed

(c) The young seagull was falling headlong now as he had overcome his fear of flight. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word “shocking” from the extract.
Answer:
‘monstrous’.

Question 8.
Then he flapped his wings once and he soared upwards. “Ga, ga, ga, Ga, ga, ga, Gaw-col-ah,” his mother swooped past him, her wings making a loud noise. He answered her with another scream. Then his father flew over him screaming. He saw his two brothers and his sister flying around him curveting and banking and soaring and diving. Then he completely forgot that he had not always been able to fly, and commended himself to dive and soar and curve, shrieking shrilly.

(a) The young seagull’s two brothers and his sister were flying around him, soaring and
Answer:
Diving

(b) The young seagull completely forgot that he had not always been
Answer:
able to fly

(c) The young seagull commended himself to dive and soar and shrieking shrilly. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the antonym of ‘falling/dropping’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘soaring’

Question 9.
He was near the sea now, flying straight over it, facing straight out over the ocean. He saw a vast green sea beneath him, with little ridges moving over it and he turned his beak sideways and cawed amusedly.

(a) The young seagull was near the sea now, flying over it.
Answer:
Straight

(b) The seagull saw a vast beneath him.
Answer:
Green sea

(c) When the young seagull saw a vast sea beneath him, he screamed shrilly. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the antonym of ‘limited’ from the extract.
Answer:
Vast

Question 10.
His parents and his brothers and sister had landed on this green flooring ahead of him. They were beckoning to him, calling shrilly. He dropped his legs to stand on the green sea. His legs sank into it. He screamed with fright and attempted to rise again flapping his wings. But he was tired and weak with hunger and he could not rise, exhausted by the strange exercise. His feet sank into the green sea, and then his belly touched it and he sank no farther. He was floating on it, and around him his family was screaming, praising him and their beaks were offering him scraps of dog-fish. He had made his first flight.

(a) The young seagull’s brothers and sister had landed on the ahead of him.
Answer:
Green flooring

(b)At the time of landing on the sea, the young seagull was tired, weak with and unable to rise.
Answer:
Hunger

(c) As a reward, the young seagull’s parents offered him scraps of dog-fish. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the synonym of ‘tired out’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘Exhausted’

Part II. The Black Aeroplane

Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Question 1.
Why was the pilot happy? Give two reasons.
Answer:
The pilot was happy for the following two reasons:
(i) He was alone high up above the sleeping countryside.
(ii) He was dreaming of his holiday and looking forward to being with his family.

Question 2.
(i) Why did the pilot call the Paris Control the first time?
(ii) What was the advice of the Paris Control?
Answer:
(i) The first time, the pilot called the Paris Control Room to enquire about the location of the plane and the route to be followed.
(ii) The Paris Control advised him to turn twelve degrees west towards England.

Question 3.
How many fuel tanks were there in the plane? How much fuel was left?
Answer:
There were two fuel tanks in the plane. The pilot had already switched over to second and the last tank so there was enough fuel only to fly back to England.

Question 4.
What did the pilot encounter while 150 km away from Paris?
Answer:
The pilot encounterd black stormy clouds, 150 kilometres away from Paris.

Question 5.
Why did the pilot fly straight into the storm instead of returning to Paris?
Answer:
The pilot had a strong desire to get back home and have breakfast with his family. That is why, pilot took the risk and flew straight into the storm instead of going back to Paris.

Question 6.
Did the Paris Control hear the pilot, the second time he called? Why?
Answer:
No, because when the pilot tried to contact the Paris Control Room, he failed to do so as his radio was dead.

Question 7.
Describe the black clouds from the point of view of the pilot.
Answer:
When Paris was about 150 kilometres behind me, I saw the black clouds in front of me. They were huge clouds looked like black mountains standing in front of me across the sky. They were stormy and I could not fly up and over them.

Question 8.
How did the black aeroplane rescue the first pilot?
Answer:
The pilot of the black aeroplane guided the first pilot and helped him arrive safely at the airport.

Question 9.
Was the pilot of the Dakota able to meet the pilot of the black aeroplane?
Answer:
No, the pilot of the Dakota could not meet the pilot of the black aeroplane. TheTirst pilot even went to the Control Room to find who the other pilot was, but he could not find him. The black aeroplane disappeared without being seen by anyone even on the ‘radar’.

Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Do you think the story ‘The Black Aeroplane’ is a mystery? Do you see some elements of supernatural power in the story? Do you believe in supernatural powers?
Answer:
The Black Aeroplane’ by Frederick Forsyth is undoubtedly a mystery. The pilot of the old Dakota plane is trapped in black stormy clouds. Nothing is visible. All the instruments of his plane also stop functioning. Suddenly from nowhere a black aeroplane appears in the cloud. The pilot of the black aeroplane guides him.

The plane has no lights on its wings but its pilot is still flying at ease. The first pilot arrives safely at the airport but when he goes to thank the pilot of the black plane, the woman in the control room even denies having seen any other aeroplane on the ‘radar’. This statement leaves the mystery of the pilot of the black aeroplane unfolded. However, there is no element of supernatural power in the story. There is no ghost or spirit in the plot. I don’t believe in supernatural elements like ghosts or spirits.

Question 2.
Was it the imagination of the pilot of Dakota aeroplane or a supreme power which helped the first pilot in landing safely? Do you think that there is always a supreme power that helps us in adversity?
Answer:
The pilot of the old Dakota aeroplane was caught in the black stormy clouds. Suddenly, a black aeroplane comes to his rescue. In the modern age of science and technology some people may reject the idea of a supreme power helping a person in crisis. It may be the imagination of the Dakota pilot. When in distress, he lost all hope. Maybe his own imagination guided him to go ahead and land safely.

I support this because the statement of the woman in the control room further confirms the non-existence of any black aeroplane on the radar. So there was neither any black aeroplane nor any pilot, it was purely the imagination of the Dakota pilot.

I personally feel the presence of supreme power in our own acts. At the time of adversity our own power helps us. We may call it supreme power or something else except supernatural power.

Question 3.
The pilot wanted to thank another pilot after his safe landing. Why? What characteristics are reflected from his action?
Answer:
The pilot of the old Dakota was caught in the storm. He lost his contact with the control room. His fuel tank was also empty. The instrument also stopped working. He had lost all hopes when a black strange plane appeared from nowhere. The pilot of the black plane asked him to follow him. He landed safely. After his landing safely, he wanted to thank the pilot. When asked the lady in the control room about the pilot, he came to know that there was no pilot or plane with him. It was only his imagination. He wanted to thank the pilot to show his gratitude. He was thankful to him for saving his life.

Question 4.
Have you ever been alone, or away from home during a thunderstorm or something like that? Narrate your experience in the form of a paragraph. What helped you in that situation?
Answer:
Yes, once I was alone and away from home during a thunderstorm. In fact, I was on an educational excursion in Himachal Pradesh. We were a group of ten students. On that particular day, I was having fever and stayed locked in my tent in the base camp. All of my friends had gone to the city for shopping. Suddenly, I noticed a huge black cloud in one corner of the valley. It grew dark and started raining. It was followed by thunderstorm. I was all alone. It was really scary. I got into my tent but soon it was blown over by the wind. I was in the open. I ran towards a guest house. One of the persons in the guest house had already seen me. He ran towards me and rescued me.

Two Stories about Flying Extra Questions and Answers Reference-to-Context

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.
The moon was coming up in the east, behind me, and stars were shining in the clear sky above me. There wasn’t a cloud in the sky. I was happy to be alone high up above the sleeping countryside. I was flying my old Dakota aeroplane over France back to England. I was dreaming of my holiday and looking forward to being with my family. I looked at my watch: one thirty in the morning.

(a) The narrator was going to
Answer:
England

(b) The narrator was dreaming of spending his holidays with .’
Answer:
his family

(c) The narrator was flying his old Dakota aeroplane over Germany to Russia. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Give a synonym of ‘gleaming’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘shining’

Question 2.
‘I should call Paris Control soon,’ I thought. As I looked down past the nose of the aeroplane, I saw the lights of a big city in front of me. I switched on the radio and said, “Paris Control, Dakota DS 088 here. Can you hear me? I’m on my way to England. Over.”

The voice from the radio answered me immediately: “DS 088, I can hear you. You ought to turn twelve degrees west now, DS 088. Over.” I checked the map and the compass, switched over to my second and last fuel tank, and turned the Dakota twelve degrees west towards England. ‘I’ll be in time for breakfast,’ I thought. A good big English breakfast! Everything was going well — it was an easy flight.

(a) The narrator called the ………………. to inform about his position and seek direction.
Answer:
Paris Control Room

(b) The control room directed the narrator to turn towards England.
Answer:
Twelve degrees west

(c) After receiving the directions from the control room, the narrator did not check the map, but followed the directions of the control room. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the synonym of ‘abruptly’ from the extract.
Answer:
Immediately.

Question 3.
Paris was about 150 kilometres behind me when I saw the clouds. Storm clouds. They were huge. They looked like black mountains standing in front of me across the sky. I knew I could not fly up and over them, and I did not have enough fuel to fly around them to the north or south.
“I ought to go back to Paris,” I thought, but I
wanted to get home. I wanted that breakfast.
‘I’ll take the risk,’ I thought, and flew that old
Dakota straight into the storm.

(a) While flying, the narrator suddenly faced storm clouds …………. him.
Answer:
In front of

(b) The dilemma of the narrator was to go to London or go back to
Answer:
Paris

(c) There were huge storm clouds that looked like black mountains across the sky. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Give a synonymous word for ‘extremely large in size’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘huge’

Question 4.
Inside the clouds, everything was suddenly black. It was impossible to see anything outside the aeroplane. The old aeroplane jumped and twisted in the air. I looked at the compass. I couldn’t believe my eyes: the compass was turning round and round and round. It was dead. It would not work! The other instruments were suddenly dead, too. I tried the radio.“Paris Control? Paris Control? Can you hear me?” There was no answer. The radio was dead too. I had no radio, no compass, and I could not see where I was. I was lost in the storm.

(a) Inside the clouds, everything was suddenly
Answer:
Black

(b) The narrator looked at the compass and found it
Answer:
Dead

(c) The old Dakota and the pilot were lost in the storm. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find a synonym of the word ‘bent’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘Twisted’

Question 5.
Then, in the black clouds quite near me, I saw another aeroplane. It had no lights on its wings, but I could see it flying next to me through the storm. I could see the pilot’s face — turned towards me. I was very glad to see another person.
He lifted one hand and waved. “Follow me,” he was saying. “Follow me.”
‘He knows that I am lost,’ I thought. ‘He’s trying to help me.’
He turned his aeroplane slowly to the north, in front of my Dakota, so that it would be easier for me to follow him. I was very happy to go behind the strange aeroplane like an obedient child.

(a) When the black clouds were quite near the narrator, he saw another
Answer:
Aeroplane

(b) The strange thing about another plane was that it did not have on its wings.
Answer:
lights

(c) The pilot of Dakota was unhappy to see another pilot and plane in the dark clouds. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Give the synonym of ‘abnormal’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘Strange’

Question 6.
After half an hour the strange black aeroplane was still there in front of me in the clouds. Now there was only enough fuel in the old Dakota’s last tank to fly for five or ten minules more. I was starting to feel frightened again. But then he started to go down and I followed through the storm. Suddenly I came out of the clouds and saw two long straight lines of lights in front of me. It was a runway! An airport! I was safe! I turned to look for my friend in the black aeroplane, but the sky was empty. There was nothing there. The black aeroplane was gone. I could not see it anywhere.

(a) The pilot of the old Dakota lost the way in the stormy clouds and so followed to land safely.
Answer:
Black plane

(b) The pilot of the old Dakota was frightened again because there was insufficient to fly for a few minutes.
Answer:
Fuel

(c) The narrator came out of the clouds and saw two long straight lines of lights in front of him. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Give a synonym of ‘afraid’ from the extract.
Answer:
Frightened.

Question 7.
I landed and was not sorry to walk away from the old Dakota near the control tower. I went and asked a woman in the control centre where I was and who the other pilot was. I wanted to say ‘Thank you’.
She looked at me very strangely, and then laughed.
“Another aeroplane? Up there in this storm? No other aeroplanes were flying tonight. Yours was the only one I could see on the radar.”
So who helped me to arrive there safely without a compass or a radio, and without any more fuel in my tanks? Who was the pilot on the strange black aeroplane, flying in the storm, without lights?

(a) The narrator and was not sorry to walk away from the old Dakota near the control tower.
Answer:
landed

(b) The woman looked at the narrator very strangely, and then
Answer:
laughed

(c) According to the woman, there was only one aeroplane in the air and it was the Dakota.
(True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find a synonym of ‘descended’ from the extract.
Answer:
‘landed’