Possessive Exercises With Answers for Class 11 CBSE

Basic English Grammar rules can be tricky. In this article, we’ll get you started with the basics of sentence structure, punctuation, parts of speech, and more.

Possessive Exercises With Answers for Class 11 CBSE PDF

Possessives are used to indicate ownership.

They include:

  • my, our, your, his, hers, its, their

Complete the following sentences using suitable possessives.
(a) I will help you clean ………………………….. room.
(b) Ravi broke ………………………….. leg in an accident.
(c) They have lost ………………………….. pencils again!
(d) These earrings have lost ………………………….. shine. They must not be gold.
(e) This coat is made of good quality wool. It has not lost ………………………….. gloss.
(f) My mother has lost ………………………….. keys again. She is searching high and low for them.
(g) Sir, Ravi will not come in today. He rang up to say that ………………………….. wife was ill.
(h) We have ………………………….. exams next week. So I am rather busy now.
(i) “What movie did you see?”!
“Sorry, I’ve forgotten ………………………….. name.”
(j) “Where is Shiela?”
“She’s gone to Jodhpur for a day with ………………………….. husband.”
Answer:
(a) your
(b) his
(c) their
(d) their
(e) its
(f) her
(g) his
(h) our
(i) their
(j) her

Demonstratives

We use pointer words such as this, that, those, these while pointing to an object, place, or person.

Complete the following sentences using suitable demonstratives.
(a) I don’t like ………………………….. house. I think it is haunted. (b) Could you pass ………………………….. box to me, please? (c) Do you remember ………………………….. people we met while on holiday? (d) ………………………….. is my brother, Gaurav.” “Hello. Pleased to meet you.” (e) Wait for me. I can’t walk fast in ………………………….. shoes.
Answer:
(a) that
(b) that
(c) those
(d) this
(e) these

Quantifiers

Quantifiers include:
some, any Both words modify either countable or uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There are some eggs in the fridge. (countable)
  • There is some water in the bottle. (uncountable)
  • Did you eat any apples? (countable)
  • Do you have any money to spare? (uncountable)

Much
Much modifies only uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • How much money do you need?
  • They ate so much rice that they are feeling sick.
  • Much effort will be required to straighten this problem.

Many
Many modifies only countable nouns.
Examples:

  • How many students are going for the trip?
  • I saw so many books at the Book Fair.
  • Many Indians immigrate to the United States of America.

A Lot Of Lots Of
These words are informal substitutes for much and many,
Examples:

  • It will require lots of effort to repair this road. (uncountable)
  • Lots of people have computers now. (countable)
  • I don’t have a lot of time left now. (uncountable)
  • A lot of Indians travel to Europe. (countable)

Little A Little
Little and a little modify only uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • I went to meet Nikhil as I had a little time to spare. (meaning ‘some time’)
  • She offered little help for my problem. (meaning ‘only a small amount)

Few/Quite A Few
These expressions modify only countable nouns.
Examples:

  • A few teachers from this school have studied abroad. (meaning ‘some’)
  • Few teachers from this school take private tuitions. (meaning ‘only a small number’)
  • Quite a few teachers from this school take private tuitions. (meaning ‘a large number)

a little bit of quite a bit of
These informal phrases usually precede uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There’s a little bit of salt in the curry. (meaning “a small amount)
  • There’s quite a bit of salt in the curry. (meaning ‘a large amount’)

Enough
This word modifies both countable and uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • We had to stand because there weren’t enough chairs. (meaning ‘less in number than required)
  • Have you got enough money for the journey? (meaning ‘as much as you require’)

Plenty Of
This term modifies both countable and uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There are plenty of books in the cupboard. (meaning ‘a large number)
  • You may take whichever you need.
  • He has plenty of money. (meaning ‘a large amount’)

No
This word modifies both countable and uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There were no boys in the park today. (number)
  • We have received no information about the meeting. (no amount)

The following chart shows which ‘quantity words’ go with which kinds of nouns. Note that ‘quantity words’ can be used in combinations such as many more, much more, and much less, any of which can be preceded by how to form questions or relative clauses. Negatives such as not and no can also be applied to many of these terms.

Countable singular each, every, any, one
Countable plural some, any, most, more, all, a lot of, no, none of the many, both, several, few/ fewer/fewest, a few, one of the, a couple of
Uncountable much, less, little, a little, very little some, any, most, more, all, a lot of, no, none of the

Circle the correct answers.
(a) Geeta: How many children have you got?
Deepa: I haven’t got somelany.
(b) Vinay: Is there any sugar in the house?
Neena: There’s any/some lying in the jar.
(c) There are no/none palm trees in Greenland and there are no/none in Germany either.
(d) I need somelany new clothes. (e) Radha: When shall I come to see you?
Deepa: Whenever you wish. Come some/any time.
(f) How many/much sugar do you take in your tea?
(g) There was littlela little water left. So we all went thirsty.
(h) I shall be ready in a few/few minutes.
(i) You cannot come with us. There aren’t manly enough seats.
(j) Am I driving too/too much fast?
Answer:
(a) any
(b) some
(c) no/none
(d) some
(e) any
(f) much
(g) little
(h) a few
(i) enough
(j) too

Complete the passage given below using suitable determiners.

My aunt lived on (a) ………………………… ground floor of (b) ………………………… old house on (c) ………………………… river Thames. She was afraid of burglars and always locked up (d) ………………………… house carefully before going to bed. She also took the precaution of looking under (e) ………………………… bed to see if (f) ………………………… burglar was hiding there.
Answer:
(a) the
(b) an
(c) X
(d) the
(e) the
(f) the

Complete the passage given below using suitable determiners.

(a) ………………………… children were hurt in (b) ………………………… road accident when (c) ………………………… school bus collided with (d) ………………………… truck while trying to save (e) ………………………… elderly man. There was (f) ………………………… doctor nearby but there were (g) ………………………… nurses passing in (h) ………………………… van. They stopped (i) ………………………… vehicle to give first aid to (j) ………………………… children.
Answer:
(a) The
(b) a
(c) the
(d) a
(e) an
(f)
(g) a few/some
(h) the
(i) the
(j) the

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