Determiners Exercises for Class 10 CBSE With Answers

Determiners are words that come before nouns. They contain several classes of words, including pronouns and adjectives. They determine or limit the noun by giving some additional information about it. Determiners show whether a noun refers to is a general or a specific object, person, or place. They indicate which or how many things the noun refers to. Determiners define or limit a noun to the singular or plural. They indicate the amount or quantity. Determiners and nouns together make noun phrases. They make noun phrases with adjectives too. Determiners may precede numerals too.

Basic English Grammar rules can be tricky. In this article, we’ll get you started with the basics of sentence structure, punctuation, parts of speech, and more.

We also providing Extra Questions for Class 10 English Chapter wise.

Determiners Exercises With Answers for Class 10 CBSE PDF

Determiners are words placed in front of a noun so that what the noun is referring to can be defined. The word “books’ by itself is a general reference to some books. If we say “these books’, we know what books we are talking about. If we say ‘some books’, we refer to a certain set of books. Here ‘these’ and ‘some are determiners.

Note: Little, a Little, the little.

  • Little is a negative adjective and means “not much”, e.g.
    He had little money (not much money).
  • A little is an affirmative adjective, and means “some at least”, e.g.
    He had a little money (some money at least, although the amount was small).
  • The little implies two statements one negative, and the other affirmative.
    He spent the little money he had.

That is

  • The money he had was not much. (Negative)
  • He spent all the money that he had. (Affirmative)

Determiners can be categorised into several categories like –
Definite and Indefinite Articles: Definite – “the”. Indefinite – ‘a’, ‘an’.
Demonstratives: this, that, these, those
Possessives: my, your, his, her, its, our, their
Quantifiers: a few, a little, much, many, a lot of, most, some, any, enough, etc.
Numbers: one, two, thirty, etc.
Distributives: either, neither, each, every, half, both, all, etc.
Words which show the difference: other, another
Question words: which, what, whose
Words which define: which, whose, etc.

Determiners Exercises Solved Example With Answers for Class 10 CBSE

Diagnostic Test – 19

Read the following dialogue and fill in the blanks by selecting the appropriate option.

Question 1.
Sahil: Will you get (a) …………………………. orange in the market?
Mother: If I get, I will buy (b) ………………………….
Sahil: Please take (c) …………………………. keys also along.
Answer:
(d) any
(b) some
(c) the

Score: For each correct answer award yourself Vi mark.
3-2 good
2-1 fair
l or less you need to develop grammar skills through adequate practice

Using Articles with Countable and Uncountable Nouns
A countable noun always takes either the indefinite (a, an) or definite (the) article when it is singular. When plural, it takes the definite article (the) if it refers to a definite, specific group and no article if it is used in a general sense.
Examples:

  • The guest of honour has arrived.
  • I am expecting a guest for dinner.
  • The guests are about to arrive.
  • Guests are welcome anytime.

Uncountable nouns never take the indefinite article (a, an), but they do take singular verbs. The is sometimes used with uncountable nouns in the same way it is used with plural countable nouns, that is, to refer to a specific object, group, or idea.
Examples:

  • The Internet helps us to access information from any part of the world.
  • The information that you gave me was incorrect.
  • Sugar has become cheaper.
  • Please put the sugar in the pot.

Quantitative Adjectives with Countable and Uncountable Nouns

1. Some, any
Both words modify either countable or uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There are some biscuits in the tin. (countable)
  • There is, some water in the bottle, (uncountable)
  • Do you serve any drinks here? (uncountable)
  • Did you eat any mangoes? (countable)

2. Much, many
Much modifies only uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • How much money do you have in the bank?
  • They ate so much food that they are feeling sick.

Many modifies only countable nouns.
Examples:

  • How many children are there in this school?
  • I saw many books at the Book Fair.
  • Many Indians work in Europe.

3. A lot of, lots of
These words are informal substitutes for much and many.
Examples:

  • She sends you lots of love, (uncountable)
  • A lot of Indians travel to Europe, (countable)

4. Little, few, quite a few
Little modifies only uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • We had a little ice cream after lunch.
  • She offered little help for my problem.

Few and quite a few modify only countable nouns.
Examples:

  • A few teachers from this school have studied abroad.
  • Few teachers from this school give private tuitions. (meaning ‘only a small number’)
  • Quite a few teachers from this school give private tuitions, (meaning ‘a large number’)

5. A little bit of, quite a bit of
These informal phrases usually precede uncountable nouns. Quite a bit o/has the same meaning as quite a little and is used more commonly.
Examples:

  • There’s a little bit of salt in the curry.
    (meaning ‘a small amount’)
  • There’s quite a bit of pepper in the curry.
    (meaning ‘a large amount’)

6. Enough
This word modifies both countable and uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • I don’t have enough tomatoes to make the sauce, (countable)
  • We have enough oil to make the sauce, (uncountable)

7. Plenty of
This term modifies both countable and uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There are plenty of fruits on the trees, (countable)
  • He has plenty of money in the bank, (uncountable)

8. No
This word modifies both countable and uncountable nouns.
Examples:

  • There were no dogs in the park today, (countable)
  • We have no information about the meeting, (uncountable)

Hence, we conclude:

  1. Countable singular: each, every, any, one
  2. Countable plural: some, any, most, more, all, a lot of, no, both, several, few/fewer/fewest, a few, a couple of
  3. Uncountable: much, less, little, a little, very little, some, any, most, more, all, a lot of, no, none of the

Diagnostic Test – 20

Fill in the blanks using suitable determiners from those given in the brackets.

(a) Ann has candies, (any/some)
(b) Bill doesn’t have money, (any/many)
(c) Sue will give us information, (some/several)
(d) There is milk in the fridge, (a lot of/few)
(e) I saw people at the railway station, (many/one)
(f) of the cars parked here belong to this company, {none!every)
Answer:
(a) some
(b) any
(c) some
(d) a lot of
(e) many
(f) None

Score: For each correct answer award yourself 1/2 mark.
3 – 2 good
2 – 1 satisfactory
1 or less you need to develop grammar skills through adequate practice

Determiners Exercises Practice Example With Answers for Class 10 CBSE

1. Fill in the blanks using suitable determiners wherever required.

(a) People.usually ask, ‘How (i) …………………………….. bird species are there in Delhi?’ and look at you as if you’ve lost your marbles when you say, that over 500 species have been recorded from Delhi state altogether, though (ii) …………………………….. more contemporary score would be a little over 400. Four hundred species, they say, or 400 birds, or is this just (iii) …………………………….. usual arrogance of people from (iv) …………………………….. capital, wanting to hog the limelight (v) …………………………….. the time. Well, Delhi ranks second only to Nairobi (Kenya, Africa) regarding the number of species that can be seen in (vi) …………………………….. capital city in the world.

(b) Global warming could wipe out (i) …………………………….. quarter of (ii) …………………………….. million species of plants and animals on earth by 2050 in (iii) …………………………….. biggest mass extinctions since the dinosaurs, according to (iv) …………………………….. international study. The United Nations said the report highlights (v) …………………………….. threats to creatures ranging from Australian butterflies to Spanish eagles.

2. Fill in the blanks using suitable determiners.
(a) …………………………….. children were asked to knit …………………………….. pair of socks for …………………………….. Annual Jumble Sale in the church.

(b) …………………………….. rain caught him unawares even though he was carrying …………………………….. umbrella in his hand and …………………………….. raincoat in his bag.

(c) …………………………….. children were playing in the playground, yet …………………………….. of them saw …………………………….. UFO land on the nearby field.

(d) I saw …………………………….. birds Sitting on …………………………….. roof of …………………………….. orange house. …………………………….. of them were sitting in one line while others were pecking at …………………………….. grains that had been scattered on …………………………….. roof. Surprisingly, …………………………….. of them moved when I walked towards them. I felt either they were tame or they had not seen me.