Clauses Exercises With Answers for Class 11 CBSE

A clause is a group of words that has a subject and a predicate. It contains a verb and sometimes other components too. So, how do we distinguish what is a clause and how exactly is it different from a phrase?

Basic English Grammar rules can be tricky. In this article, we’ll get you started with the basics of sentence structure, punctuation, parts of speech, and more.

Clauses Exercises With Answers for Class 11 CBSE PDF

Complete the following passages using the appropriate forms of the words given in brackets.

Question 1.
The city was torn by riots. The old man did not know the place (a) ………………………. (he – go) along with his daughter. Since the house was surrounded by rioters, he even did not know (b) ………………………. (escape – them). He, therefore, told his daughter (c) ………………………. (she – hide) somewhere … anywhere.
Answer:
(a) where he should go
(b) How they could escape from them
(c) that she should hide

Question 2.
The findings of a Housing Study show (a) ………………………. (poor suffer – most). The lack of resources, rising cost of material and land are the problems (b) ………………………. (make housing difficult – poor). The government’s worry is (c) ………………………. (cut down – cost of housing) so that the poor can buy houses.
Answer:
(a) that the poor suffer the most
(b) which makes housing difficult for the poor
(c) how it can cut down the cost of housing

A clause is a group of words that forms part of a sentence and has a subject and a predicate or a finite verb of its own.
Example:

  • This is the house where I was born.
  • Clauses are of three kinds:

Clauses Exercises With Answers for Class 11

Subordinate Clauses are of 3 types:
Clauses Exercises With Answers for Class 11

Noun Clauses

The Noun Clause does the work of a noun in the sentence. It is introduced by the following connectives:

Pronouns: who, what, which, whom, whose
Example:

  • I know who he is.

Adverbs: when, where, why, how
Examples:

  • I asked him if he knew where the post office was.
  • I don’t know why he does not study.

Conjunctions: that, whether, if
Examples:

  • I think that Raghu is a liar.
  • I asked her whether she wanted a book to read.

A noun clause may be used:

(a) as a subject.
Example:

  • What you are doing – is dishonest.
  • Whether she will come – is uncertain.
  • That the earth revolves around the sun – has been proved.

(b) as a compliment:

  • My opinion is – that – he is innocent.
  • The question is – how – we should tackle the issue.
  • The problem is – where – we should stay.
  • I am sure – that – I have done the right thing.

(c) in apposition:

  • The rumor – that – he has sold his shares is baseless.
  • It is sure – that – we will win the match.

(d) as an object to a proposition:

  • You must pay attention to what is taught in class.

Complete the sentences using the hints given in brackets to form noun clauses as shown.
Example:

  • …………………………. is true. (he/liar)
    That he is a liar is true.

(a) No one can know …………………………. (he/getting on).
(b) I heard …………………………. (he/success).
(c) …………………………. (reason/his sudden change of mind) is not known.
(d) I fear …………………………. (I/fail).
(e) I know …………………………. (he/come).
(f) He told me …………………………. (you/feeling unwell).
(g) I don’t see …………………………. (you/get out of mess).
(h) (you/say this) …………………………. is very strange.
(i) I do not know …………………………. (he/angry).
(j) (we/stay/tonight) …………………………. is the problem.
Answer:
(a) No one can know how he is getting on.
(b) I heard that he was a success.
(c) The reason for his sudden change of mind is not known.
(d) I fear that I will fail.
(e) I know that he will come
(f) He told me that you were feeling unwell
(g) I don’t see you getting out of the mess.
(h) What you say is very strange
(i) I didn’t know that he is angry.
(j) Our staying here tonight is the problem.

Adverb Clauses

The adverb clause functions as an adverb, i.e. it modifies verbs. Therefore, an adverb clause may appear anywhere in a sentence. It tells us why, where, under what conditions, or to what degree the action occurred or the situation existed. Unlike adjective clauses, they frequently change their position within the sentence. Example: When the timer rings, we know the cake is done.

OR

We know the cake is done when the timer rings.
Adverb Clauses may be classified as Adverb Clauses of Condition, Time, Place, Reason, Manner, Purpose, etc.

Adverb Clauses Of Condition

Adverbial Clauses of Condition are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions: if, unless, provided, provided that, on condition that, so long as, whether…or, had, were, in case.

There are four types of Conditionals.

Type Example Form Use
Conditional Main
cause and effect Ice turns to water if you heat it. If/When + 1 st form of verb Subject + 1st form of verb to describe a general truth, laws, habitual reactions, scientific facts
open present condition If I see him, I will give him a lift. If + noun/pronoun + 1 st form of verb Subject + will/ may/might + 1 st form of verb to describe something that is likely to happen in a given situation
improbable condition If I had the money, I would travel around the world. If + noun/pronoun + 3rd form of verb Noun/pronoun + would/might + 1 st form of verb to describe something in a real situation that is unlikely to happen or is not about reality
impossible condition If I had known you were in hospital, I would have visited you. If + noun/pronoun + had + 3rd form of verb Noun/pronoun + would/might + have + 3rd form of verb to speculate about the past, expressing regret, criticism or relief

Complete the following sentences using the appropriate form of the verbs given in brackets.

(a) If anyone …………………………. (ring up), tell them I’ll be back by 5.30 p.m.
(b) If you really want to learn French, you …………………………. (need) to spend some time in France.
(c) If you …………………………. (listen) to me, we wouldn’t be lost.
(d) I …………………………. (give) you a lift if I had my car here.
(e) If they had found him in time, they …………………………. (able) to save his life.
(f) If Mohit was honest, he …………………………. (return) the money.
(g) What would you do if you …………………………. (win) the lottery?
(h) If he …………………………. (not break) the window, then who did?
(i) If I had known how difficult it was to get here, I …………………………. (not undertake) the journey.
(j) …………………………. (not be) for my parents, I wouldn’t be where I am.
Answer:
(a) If anyone rings up, tell them I’ll be back by 5:30 p.m.
(b) If you really want to learn French, you need to spend some time in France.
(c) If you had listened to me, we wouldn’t be lost.
(d) I would have given you a lift if I had my car here.
(e) If they had found him in time, they would have been able to save his life.
(f) If Mohit was honest, he would return the money.
(g) What would you do if you win the lottery?
(h) If he did not break the window, then who did?
(i) If I had known how difficult it was to get here, I would have not undertaken the journey.
(j) Had it not been for my parents, I wouldn’t be where I am.

Adverb Clauses Of Time

Adverbial Clauses of Time are often called ‘time clauses’. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
when, before, until, since, than, as, the moment, till, as soon as, after, while, etc.

Examples:

  • He saw Meena when he was in Lucknow.
  • We will finish before he arrives.
  • She began cooking while I was finishing my homework.

Note: When the sentence begins with an adverb clause, use a comma to separate the two clauses.
Example:

  • When she called, he had already eaten lunch.

When the adverb clause finishes the sentence, there is no need for a comma.
Example:

  • He gave me a call when he arrived in town.

Adverb Clauses Of Place

Adverbial Clauses of Place show the place of action. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions: where, wherever, whence, etc.
Examples:

  • Wherever you go, the dog will follow.
  • Where there is a will, there is a way.
  • I will sit where I want.

Adverb Clauses Of Purpose
Adverbial Clauses of Purpose show the purpose or the reason behind an action. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
that, so that, in order that, lest, etc.

Examples:

  • Walk fast lest you miss the bus.
  • Work hard so that you may pass the exam.
  • Take care that you may do well.

Adverb Clauses Of Reason
Adverbial Clauses of Reason give the reason of an action. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
since, because, for, as, that, etc.

Examples:

  • Because he was unwell, he did poorly in the examination.
  • Since 15 August is a national holiday, we don’t have to go to work that day.
  • Altaf went back to Srinagar in order to take care of some business of his company.
  • He isn’t able to lift any weights since he broke his right arm.

Adverb Clauses Of Manner

Adverbial Clauses of Manner give the manner in which an action takes place. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
as, as…So, as if, as though, etc.

Examples:

  • She danced as if her life depended upon it.
  • As you sow, so shall you reap.
  • Try to knit as I have shown you.

Adverb Clauses Of Result
Adverbial Clauses of Result show the consequence or result of an action. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
SO…. that, such … that

Note: Adverbial Clause of Result may be preceded by so/such in the Principal Clause.
Examples:

  • She was so weak that she could not walk.
  • She spoke in such a way that I could follow her.
  • I am so tired that I just want to sleep.

Adverb Clauses Of Comparison
Adverbial Clauses of Comparison compare two actions or objects. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
than, as
Examples:

  • She is not so weak as you think.
  • He is even more foolish than I thought he was.

Adverb Clauses Of Contrast
Adverbial Clauses of Contrast show the difference between two actions or objects. These clauses are introduced by the following subordinating conjunctions:
though, although, even if, however, all the same, etc.

Examples:

  • Although it was raining, he went for a walk.
  • However hard he may work now, he will fail.
  • I will not believe you, whatever you may say.

Complete the following sentences using the appropriate form of the words given in brackets as shown.

(a) I have not been well …………………………. (return/Chennai)
I have not been well since I returned from Chennai.

(b) We ran fast …………………………. (arrive in time)
(c) …………………………., we missed the train. (run fast)
(d) No one can succeed …………………………. (work hard)
(e) …………………………. yet he is contented. (poor)
(f) ………………………….. the birds go back to their nests. (sun set)
(g) He spoke so softly …………………………. (cannot hear)
(h) You may sit …………………………. (like)
(i) Come home early …………………………. (not safe/after dark)
(j) …………………………. he remained at home. (feel unwell)
Answer:
(a) I have not been well since I returned from Chennai
(b) We ran fast as the train had arrived.
(c) Despite running fast. We missed the train
(d) No one can succeed without working hard.
(e) He is poor yet he is contented.
(f) After sun set the birds go back to their nests.
(g) He spoke so softly that I couldn’t hear.
(h) You may sit if you feel like
(i) Come here early as it is not safe after dark.
(j) He was feeling unwell so je remained at home.

Relative Clauses

A Relative Clause (also called Adjective Clause) modifies a noun or pronoun by providing extra information. Relative clauses begin with a relative pronoun (who, whom, which, that, whose). Relative clauses can either be restrictive or non – restrictive.

Restrictive Relative Clauses :
A restrictive relative clause is essential in order to complete the meaning of the main clause.
Example:

  • Where is the girl who is going with us?

Non – restrictive Relative Clauses
A non – restrictive relative clause adds definition to the main clause, but is not necessary to complete the meaning. Non – restrictive relative clauses are set off by commas.
Example:

  • That girl, who is wearing a green dress, is my best friend.

Complete the following sentences using the appropriate form of the words given in brackets as shown.

(a) Do you know the woman …………………………. (blue sari)?
Do you know the woman who is wearing the blue sari?

(b) The boy …………………………. (sit near me) is my cousin.
(c) That was the reason …………………………. (come late).
(d) Students …………………………. (fail/final examination) will not be promoted.
(e) The house …………………………. (I live in) belongs to my father.
Answer:
(a) Do you know the woman who is wearing the blue sari?
(b) The boy who is sitting near me is my cousin.
(c) That was the reason why I came late.
(d) Students who failed in the final examination will not promote.
(e) The house that I live in belongs to my father.

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