The Enemy Extra Questions and Answers Class 12 English Vistas

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The Enemy Extra Questions and Answers Class 12 English Vistas

The Enemy Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Question 1.
Why didn’t Sadao want to know anything about the white man?
Answer:
He didn’t want to know any details about the white man because he didn’t want to become emotionally involved with him. The less he knew about the white man, the better it would have been for both, him and the white man.

Question 2.
How is Hana’s perspective about the white man different from Yumi’s perspective?
Answer:
Hana sees the white man as a person who is in need of help and not as a nameless enemy who should be killed, as per Yumi. This point is central to the story because it talks about how all people are similar and that they should all be treated in a humane and respectful way.

Question 3.
The theme of racism is reflected in the story. Give examples.
Answer:
The theme of racism is reflected in the story in several ways:
Because of the stress of Sadao’s father on ‘purity of race’ and traditionalism, Sadao didn’t start a relationship with Hana until he was sure that she “had been pure in her race”.

Yumi refused to touch the American or wash him before the operation. Moreover, when he left, she “cleaned the guest room thoroughly … to get the white man’s smell out of it.” Sadao has strong feelings against white people. Both Sadao and Hana felt that Americans were racists.

Question 4.
What did Dr Sadao do to help Tom escape to freedom?
Answer:
Dr Sadao knew that the wounded American sailor, Tom could be arrested any time. So he decided to help him in escaping. He decided to give his private boat with food and clothes in it. He could row it to a little island not far from the coast. Nobody lived there. In this way, he could escape to freedom.

Question 5.
Why did Dr Sadao help in the escape of the American soldier? Was it an act of treachery? Can you justify his action?
Answer:
Dr Sadao had given the information about the wounded American to the General. In turn, the General had promised to send assassins to kill him and get rid of the body. Sadao did wait for the General’s people to arrive. In the back of his mind, he knew he was a doctor whose job was to save people. Therefore, when the authority failed, Sadao decided to help the American escape. It cannot be called an act of treachery because he had been an absolute doctor and a citizen, and more importantly, a good human being. He did not want the person, he had served, to be killed.

Question 6.
Why did the messenger come to Dr Sadao? What did Hana think about it?
Answer:
Dr Sadao had been summoned to the palace to treat the ailing General. This relieved Hana, since she expected it to be a punishment for helping and providing refuge to an enemy. As the General was ill, he could require an operation any moment. Hana got very anxious to think about the consequences her family might have to face for harbouring an enemy soldier. When an official in uniform knocked her door, she thought that he might have come to apprehend her husband.

Question 7.
In what context does Hana remember General Takima? What does she infer?
Answer:
While applying medicine to the young soldier, as Sadao operated on him, Hana wondered if the stories of torture of POWs were true. She then remembered how General Takima ruthlessly beat his wife. Hana deduced that if General Takima could be so cruel to his wife, he could as well be extremely cruel to a prisoner. The deep red scars on the white man’s neck, confirmed her apprehension.

Question 8.
How did Dr Sadao ensure that the American soldier left his house but he himself remained safe and secure?
Answer:
Dr Sadao was a Japanese surgeon. After treating the American war prisoner, he informed the General as a true Japanese about the soldier. But as a doctor, he saved his life by providing him right treatment and helped him escape in the darkness of the night.

Question 9.
Why did Hana wash the wounded soldier herself?
Answer:
Hana, wife of Dr Sadao, washed the wounds of the American prisoner of war herself because the domestic servants refused to do it as he was from an enemy country. They all left the doctor’s house.

Question 10.
How does the writer indicate that Dr Sadao’s father was a very traditional and conventional man?
Answer:
Dr Sadao’s father was a very traditional and conventional man. He believed that the islands in the distance were the stepping stones to Japan’s future. He was a quiet man. He never joked or played with his son. His father was stern but cared a lot for his future. He believed in traditional and arranged marriages. He was proud of his nation and never used foreign goods. Everything in his room was made in Japan. He did not sit on a chair or sleep on a bed and rather slept on a mat.

Question 11.
What help did Dr Sadao seek from Hana while operating the wounded white man?
Answer:
Dr Sadao asked Hana to fetch towels. He asked her to help him turn the wounded soldier. Sadao asked Hana to administer an anaesthetic to the wounded white man, if required. He also asked her to soak cotton with the anaesthetic and hold it near his nostrils.

Question 12.
What forced Dr Sadao to be impatient and irritable with his patient?
Answer:
Sadao heard Hana vomiting in the garden. The distress and inability to go out to her at once made him impatient and irritable with his patient. He was faced with the dilemma of whether he was doing the right thing in treating the patient who had caused so much inconvenience.

Question 13.
How did Hana react when she saw a messenger at the door in official uniform?
Answer:
The servants of the household had left in protest. Hana was working hard to do things at home, more because she was not used to working at home. When she saw the messenger in official uniform, her hands became weak and she could not breathe freely. She thought the servants must have already told the Japanese army about the enemy sheltered in their house. She felt helpless and afraid.

Question 14.
Was Dr Sadao arrested on the charge of harbouring an enemy?
Answer:
No, Dr Sadao was not arrested on the charge of harbouring an enemy, since the old General himself required the services of Dr Sadao. ft was the only reason for not sending Dr Sadao abroad with the troops.

Question 15.
Why does Dr Sadao mutter the words ‘My friend’ while treating the American prisoner of war? What is ironical about his words?
Answer:
Dr Sadao was trained to address patients as friends. Therefore, he utters the words ‘My friend’ while treating the American prisoner of war. However, it was ironical, since the patient was from an enemy nation.

Question 16.
What role did the American professor play in bringing Hana and Sadao together?
Answer:
The American professor and his wife were kind people. They were anxious to do something for their few foreign students. But their rooms were quite small, the food was very bad, the professor was a dull person and his wife was a silly talkative woman. At the professor’s house, he met Hana, fell in love with her and eventually married her.

Question 17.
What was Sadao’s father’s dream for him? How did Sadao realise it?
OR
What was his father’s chief concern about Dr Sadao?
Answer:
Sadao’s education was his father’s chief concern. Dr Sadao realised it when he was sent to America at the age of 22 to learn all he could of surgery and medicine. Finally, he became an eminent surgeon and scientist. His father wanted him to serve Japan.

Question 18.
“But Sadao searching the spot of black in the twilight sea that night, had his reward”. What was the reward?
Answer:
‘The reward’ was the escape of the enemy. Despite all moral dilemma, Dr Sadao listens to his heart every time and takes the right decision and his wife, Hana gently follows him. At last, the General forgets to keep his promise, which gives Sadao an opportunity ‘ to reconsider his decision. He gives the soldier a boat, food, bottled water and quilts, and asks him to wait for a Korean fishing boat to escape. Dr Sadao searched the spot of black in the twilight sea that night to see if the man was still there, but there was no light. Obviously the man had gone.

Question 19.
Why was Dr Sadao not sent abroad along with the troops?
Answer:
The General considered Dr Sadao indispensable. He felt that his life could be saved only by him as he was very skilled. He also does not trust anyone except Dr Sadao. So Dr Sadao was not sent with troops.

Question 20.
Where, when and how did Dr Sadao meet Hana?
Answer:
Dr Sadao met Hana in America at a party hosted by Professor Harley for foreign students.

Question 21.
In what condition did Dr Sadao find the American soldier at the seashore?
Answer:
While standing outside their house, Dr Sadao and his wife saw something crawl out of the sea. They rushed and found that he was a wounded prisoner of war. He was motionless with his face in the sand. He had suffered a gun wound on the right side of his lower back which had reopened.

Question 22.
Why did Dr Sadao take the man in and save him?
Answer:
Dr Sadao was a patriot to the core. The man, an American, was his enemy. Obviously, he did not want to save him. However, the man was wounded. Being a doctor, it was Sadao’s sacred duty to save his life, if he could. He was trained not to let a man die, if he could help him. Obviously, Dr Sadao had to choose between his role as a private individual and as a citizen with a sense of national commitment. Dr Sadao took the man in and operated on him. He took care of the man and kept him in his house till the prisoner was on the path of recovery.

Question 23.
Where had Dr Sadao first met his wife? What had been his initial reaction?
Answer:
Dr Sadao met his wife for the first time in America in professor Harley’s house. He waited to fall in love with her as he wanted to be sure whether she was a Japanese or not.

The Enemy Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Dr Sadao was a patriotic Japanese as well as a dedicated surgeon. How could he honour both the values?
OR
What impression do you form about Dr Sadao as a man and as a surgeon on your reading the chapter, ‘The Enemy’?
Answer:
Dr Sadao was a true Japanese. He was obedient and loved the Japanese tradition and culture. He waited for his father’s approval for marrying Hana, a girl he loved. He loved his family a lot. Dr Sadao was an eminent surgeon as well as a scientist. He was the on-call doctor for the General. Sadao truly believed in his professional ethics and hence, harbours an injured prisoner of war. He faces a lot of difficulties at home from his wife and servants but still decides not to forgo his professional duties.

With great risk to his life and his position in the society, he nurses him and cares for him very well. He could not let personal prejudice override his duties as a doctor. However, out of patriotism, he tells the general about the American P.O.W. in his house. He could not destroy a human creation and therefore, asks for the General’s help. When the plan of the General did not materialise, he helped the prisoner escape.

Question 2.
The fog in the story, ‘The Enemy’ is symbolic. Elucidate.
Answer:
The fog which appears soon before the American soldier shows up, symbolises Sadao and Hana’s predicament and the lack of clarity concerning what they should do with the man on the beach. It might also symbolise secrecy. Considerations of safety compel them to keep the man’s presence in their home a secret. They’re faced with the dilemma of whether or not to save the man’s life. On the one hand, sheltering an enemy in their home, especially an enemy prisoner, could endanger the entire family. On the other . hand, they feel incapable of throwing a wounded man back into the sea, where he would certainly die. For the same reason, they hesitate to turn him over to the police.

Question 3.
How did Dr Sadao overcome the difficulty that came in his way to save the wounded soldier? How did Hana help her husband?
OR
Dr Sadao faced a dilemma. Should he use his surgical skills to save the life of a wounded person or hand an escaped American RO.W. over to the Japanese police? How did he resolve this clash of values? [CBSE (AI) 2015]
Answer:
Dr Sadao was an expert surgeon. He was living in a house near the beach with his family. He was very generous and loyal to his country. His wife was also a sympathetic, kind, obedient and loving woman. While standing outside their house, they saw something crawl on the beach. They rushed and found that he was a wounded prisoner of war. Initially, the couple contemplated throwing the prisoner of war back into sea. But both of them did not have the heart for it. Also the prisoner would have died, if he was handed over to the police. As a doctor, Sadao was trained to save a life, if he could. Seeing him badly wounded, the doctor and his wife brought him home for treatment.

It was a big risk. Even the servants were against them. Dr Sadao performed the operation and his wife stood by him and helped him every moment. There was a great risk of Dr Sadao being arrested for harbouring a prisoner of war. Being loyal to his nation, he declared everything to the General and was ready to face the consequences. The General assured to help him get rid of the man but forgot to send his men. At last, Dr Sadao arranged for a boat, food and clothing to send him to the nearby island. He suggested to the American to board a Korean fishing boat, and get away to safety.

Question 4.
What explains the attitude of the General in the matter of the enemy soldier? Was it human consideration, lack of national loyalty, dereliction of duty or simply self-absorption?
Answer:
Dr Sadao knew that the General needed his medical assistance as he was undergoing medical treatment. So Sadao thought of taking advantage of the situation. He told the General what had happened and how he saved the enemy. He tried to make the General understand that the General is not dependent on him as a doctor, if he needed services for his treatment. But the General trusted no one but Sadao to treat him. Thinking about his personal well-being, the General now assured Sadao that no one will know of . the incident about the enemy and he will arrange for the enemy to be killed in a way no one will know. But the General didn’t seem to send his men to Sadao’s house, so Sadao helped in the enemy’s escape.

Sadao now narrated everything that happened to the General, who apologised for having failed to keep up his promise. He explained Sadao that he had taken ill so badly that he could not think of anything else. But the General now assured Sadao that in case the authorities question him in connection with the enemy, he would stand in support of him, and his action would not be considered as lack of national loyalty or dereliction of duty but as human consideration.

Question 5.
Why did Sadao help the American soldier to escape? How did he do it?
Answer:
Dr Sadao was sheltering an enemy in his house. This was no more a secret. It was the cause of great deal of tension to his wife and him. Dr Sadao worked upon an idea to get rid of the man and discussed it with the prisoner. He decided to put his boat on shore that night, with food, bottled water and clothing plus two quilts. The man was to row to the little island not far from the coast.

The island was uninhabited. The man would be safe there till a Korean fishing boat passed by. In the night, the boat was pulled down with all the provisions in it, which he had secretly purchased during the day. He even gave him a flashlight along with some instructions. If his food ran out before catching a boat, he had to signal twice, at sunset. If everything was all right and he was still there, he was to signal once.
The man escaped and Sadao had a peaceful sleep.

Question 6.
Dr Sadao was compelled by his duty as a doctor to help the enemy soldier. What made Hana, his wife, sympathise with him in the face of open defiance from the domestic staff?
Answer:
Dr Sadao was a Japanese surgeon. One day, he found a wounded prisoner of war of . American origin on the seashore. He and his wife brought him home and tended his wounds. He came to his senses and recovered fully. But Dr Sadao faced problems and dilemma. If he treated him, he would be marked as a traitor who helped a P.O.W. who belonged to an enemy country.

The domestic staff refused to nurse the soldier. Therefore, Hana, wife of Sadao, being an obedient wife, helped her husband. She helped and sympathised with the soldier in the name of humanity. The attitude of maid servants was laced with anger and prejudice towards the enemy, but Dr Sadao and his wife’s attitude and feelings were of a very high level.

Question 7.
Draw a character sketch of the old General in the lesson, ‘The Enemy’.
Answer:
General Takima, being the head of the Japanese army, was more concerned about himself than the general people of his country. Dr Sadao was a surgeon. He could be a boon for the wounded soldiers during the world war. But the General asked him to stay back for himself only because he may require an operation any time. Thus, he was a selfish man. It was said that he used to hit his wife. But he was a kind man also. Though the General promised to get the P.O.W. killed, but he desisted from his plan. It is also hoped that he forgot to send the assassins to wipe out the American soldier or he was concerned with the security of the doctor and his family as the public knowledge of P.O.W. could harm them. For the General, it was very important that no harm comes to his surgeon.

Question 8.
Why did Sadao Hoki go to America? Narrate his experiences there.
Answer:
Sadao’s education was his father’s chief concern. So he had been sent at twenty-two to America to learn all that could be learnt of surgery and medicine. He studied there for eight years and returned to Japan at thirty. Before his father died, Sadao had become famous not only as a surgeon, but also as a scientist.

He had great difficulty in finding a place to live in America because he was a Japanese. The Americans were full of prejudice and it had been bitter to live in it, knowing himself to be superior than them. An ignorant and dirty old woman at last consented to house ftim in her miserable home. He found her repulsive to him even in her kindness. One of his American Professors and his wife were kind people. They were anxious to do something for their few foreign students. But their rooms were quite small, the food was very bad, the professor was a dull person and his wife was a silly talkative woman.

Question 9.
Good human values are far above any other value system. How did Dr Sadao succeed as a doctor as well as a patriot?
Answer:
Dr Sadao had a harmonious blending of his profession and patriotism in him though he suffered from a dilemma and acted more as a doctor, after he encountered Tom, the American prisoner of war. Nationalism was ingrained in Dr Sadao and that made him return home to serve his country and marry a Japanese as his father wished him to. His own experience in America had been unpleasant because of a racial bias. However, when he found the prisoner of war and waited for a couple of days for the General’s assassin to get rid of Tom, his profession had taught him to save his life and not to kill a patient.

Dr Sadao withstood the discomfiture at hoe when all his servants left him, regarding him as unpatriotic. He finally decided to put Tom on a boat, with food and clothing, to row to a little island nearby and wait patiently to board a Korean fishing boat to escape. Things happened as planned, leaving Dr Sadao in a state of bewilderment as to why he saved the life of an American enemy. Perhaps, it is the doctor who dominated the patriot in him.

Question 10.
In marriage one expects complete trust and cooperation between husband and wife. How did Hana help Dr Sadao when he was in trouble?
Answer:
Hana was an impeccable wife and stood by her husband in all his decisions. She helped Dr Sadao when he was operating upon the American. Even though she was repulsed by the wounds of the American, she stayed with her husband and played the role of a nurse. Afterwards, she nursed the American till he was healthier. They could not call for a nurse because keeping an American alive was against the law. When all the servants left them, she washed the prisoner herself.

Question 11.
Dr Sadao planned and helped the enemy soldier to escape. Comment.
Answer:
Dr Sadao told General about the American prisoner of war and he promised to send his assassins to kill him. Dr Sadao waited for three nights. When no one turned, then he decided to help him. He gave him his Japanese clothes, boat and food. He instructed him that he would row his boat to the little island. There he would have a Korean fishing boat. He arranged everything for the prisoner. He told him that if he ran short of food, he would flash two signals when the sun sets. If he was alright and was on the island, he would flash one. So, the white soldier safely boarded the Korean fishing boat. This way, Dr Sadao planned and helped the enemy soldier to escape safely.

Question 12.
The servants of Sadao and Hana reflect a particular mindset of the general public in society towards the thinking and broad-minded human beings. Elaborate with the help of the story, ‘The Enemy’.
Answer:
The servants of Sadao and Hana reflected a particular mindset of the general public in society towards the thinking and broad-minded human beings. They were openly defiant to the fact that Dr Sadao had decided to give shelter to an enemy. They suspected Dr Sadao as he lived in America so he might have sympathy for all Americans.

The servants, especially the gardener quoted that Dr Sadao had acted against the nature. ‘Idiey decided to quit, and leave. The cook too was most contemptuous of the fact that their master was so proud of his skills to save life that he could save any person’s life even though he was their enemy. They acted like any normal patriot and like the general public of the society.