The Address Extra Questions and Answers Class 11 English Snapshots

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The Address Extra Questions and Answers Class 11 English Snapshots

The Address Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Question 1.
Describe the first visit of Mrs daughter to the house of Mrs Dorling.
Answer:
Mrs daughter found Mrs Dorling’s house and rang the bell. Mrs Dorling opened the door but was-not happy to see the visitor. She rudely said that people who had left did not return. She did not allow the visitor to come in and closed the door saying she could not do any thing for her.

Question 2.
Why do you think Mrs. Dorling, knowingly refused to recognize the narrator when she went to meet after years?
Answer:
Mrs Dorling had removed many valuables and antiques from the narrator’s family on the pretext of taking care of them. Now, that the narrator, the daughter of Mrs S, had come to claim them, Mrs Dorling did not wish to return them. Therefore, she refused to recognize her.

Question 3.
How did the narrator realise that she had come to the right address?
Answer:
The narrator knew that she had come to the right address because the woman who opened the door was wearing her mother’s green cardigan.

Question 4.
Who was Mrs Dorling? Why did she visit Mrs S’s house frequently?
Answer:
Mrs Dorling was merely an acquaintance of Mrs S. Mrs S belonged to a wealthy Jewish family and all her possessions were beautiful and of great value. The Second World War broke out and the Jews were persecuted everywhere. The Germans were in control. Jews had to leave their homes and possessions behind to save their lives. In this background Mrs Dorling revived her acquaintance with Mrs S and carried away suitcases and sackfuls of precious things saying she wanted ‘to save’ all the nice things.

Question 5.
Why did Mrs S ask her daughter to remember the address of Mrs Dorling?
Answer:
Mrs Dorling had taken the valuable possessions of Mrs S for safe keeping. Mrs S wanted her daughter to remember the address so that she could claim their belongings some day after the war.

Question 6.
How did the narrator in ‘The Address’ come to know that the cutlery was silver?
Answer:
In her conversation with Mrs. Dorling’s daughter, the narrator realised that Mrs. Dorling had stolen her family’s valuable possessions. She remembered that her mother had asked her to polish the silver cutlery.

Question 7.
What were the narrator’s feelings initially about the things that had been left with Mrs Dorling?
Answer:
The narrator was not interested in claiming the things that were stored with Mrs. Dorling as ‘the things’ were lifeless possessions. They were not important as dear and loved ones whom she had lost during the war. Her mother did not survive after the war. Moreover, she was afraid that they would remind her of her past.

Question 8.
Why does the narrator say, “I was in a room I knew and did not know”?
Answer:
All around in Mrs. Dorling’s home the narrator saw the precious possessions of her family. They were displayed in an ugly setting. Though the things were known to her, their environment was tasteless and crude.

Question 9.
How was Mrs Dorling taking care of the antiques and other things she had taken from Mrs S?
Answer:
Mrs. Dorling did not take good care of the antiques, and other things she had taken from Mrs. S. She arranged the things in a very taskless manner. She did not even know that the spoons, knives and forks she was using every day were made of silver.

Question 10.
Why did the narrator not wait for Mrs Dorling on her second visit?
Answer:
When the narrator went the second time to 46, Marconi Street, she noticed the Hanukkah which belonged to her family, the antiques, her familiar woollen table cloth, a painting, the teapot and the silver cutlery of her family. They were arranged in a tasteless way and handled carelessly. She was filled with disgust and suddenly did not want those beautiful things. She did not want to meet Mrs Dorling and left the house.

Question 11.
Why did the narrator of the story want to forget the address?
Answer:
The narrator wanted to forget the address because she did not want to take back her family’s precious possessions—the antiques, silver, paintings, etc. from Mrs Dorling. Initially, she had gone to 46, Marconi Street to take back her belongings, but when she saw them in a different setting, used carelessly and crudely she no longer felt the attachment and desire to have them back as she had felt earlier. In fact, she was so repelled by her experience that she did not even wait for Mrs Dorling and came away. She felt it would be easy to forget that address.

Question 12.
Could Mrs S’s daughter get back to her old life after she came back to the city where she lived before the war?
Answer:
No, she could not. Before the war—Mrs S and her daughter lived a life of comfort and luxury. Their house was full of beautiful things and expensive antiques. Their everyday cutlery was made of silver.

After the war, Mrs S’s daughter came back to the town alone. The family was probably dead. She lived in a small room. The bread that she ate was dark and tasteless. She had seen fear and insecurity. She did not even have place to keep her mother’s possessions which they left under Mrs. Dorling’s custody. Her lifestyle did not at all resemble her earlier luxurious living.

The Address Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
Why did the narrator, Mrs S’s daughter, specially make a trip to 46, Marconi Street? Did she achieve her purpose?
Answer:
The narrator, Mrs. S’s daughter, specially made a trip to 46, Marconi Street to get back her mother’s priceless belongings which Mrs. Dorling had taken from her mother with the understanding that she would return them after the war. No, she did not achieve her purpose as she could not get them back. The narrator met with an extremely cold and unfriendly atmosphere at 46, Marconi Street. Mrs Dorling did not like that she had come back for them. She refused to recognize her first, she did not allow the narrator to enter their house. Then she pretended to be busy and closed the door on her face.

Question 2.
How did Mrs Dorling receive Mrs S’s daughter when she came back after several years? How do you explain her behaviour?
Answer:
Mrs Dorling was extremely cold and unfriendly to the narrator, Mrs S’s daughter, when she came back after several years. She understood she had come to claim the beautiful possessions like antiques and silver cutlery which had belonged to her family. Mrs Dorling had no intention of returning them. Therefore, she was cold and rude. She did not even let her in. She told her that she could not do anything for her. It was not convenient for her to meet the narrator and that she should come some other time. Then she closed the door while the narrator was still on the doorstep.

Question 3.
Describe the second visit of Mrs S’s daughter to the house of Mrs Dorling. Why did she not wait to meet Mrs Dorling?
Answer:
When the narrator went the second time to 46, Marconi Street, it was Mrs. Dorling’s daughter who opened the door and let the narrator come into the house. Immediately she recognized her mother’s priceless possessions, she noticed the Hanukkah which belonged to her family. The walls had the antiques. Her familiar woollen table cloth was on the table and she recognized a painting, the.teapot and the silver cutlery of her family.

Seeing these things, however, they did not give her any pleasure because they were arranged in a tasteless way and handled carelessly. She was filled with disgust and suddenly lost the desire to get those beautiful things back. So she did not want to meet Mrs Dorling and left the house, deciding never to visit 46, Marconi Street again.

Question 4.
How did Mrs Dorling acquire the possessions of Mrs S? What extraordinary circumstances made it possible? Do you justify Mrs Dorling’s conduct?
Answer:
Mrs. Dorling was merely an acquaintance of Mrs S. Mrs S belonged to a wealthy Jewish family and all her possessions were beautiful and of great value.

The Second World War broke out and the Jews were persecuted everywhere. The Germans were in control. The Jews had to leave their homes and possessions behind to save their lives.

In this background, Mrs Dorling revived her acquaintance with Mrs S and carried away suitcases and sackfuls of precious things saying she wanted ‘to save’ all the nice things. Mrs Dorling had no intention of returning those fine things. Mrs Dorling’s behaviour cannot be justified. She acted out of greed and meanness. She did not even admit Mrs. S’s daughter into her house and was exceedingly rude.

Question 5.
Why did the narrator say that forgetting Mrs Dorling’s address would be the easiest of all the things?
Answer:
The narrator said that forgetting Mrs. Dorling’s address would be easy because of the painful experience of the narrator. Besides, Mrs. Dorling did not take good care of her mother’s possessions. She was saddened to see the crudeness of Mrs Dorling’s household and the insensitive way, the precious antiques of her family were handled. She immediately decided to forget about everything connected with her past. She wanted to continue living her new life. She resolved to forget the address as she felt that of all the things, she had to forget, forgetting the address would be the easiest.

Question 6.
Compare the lifestyle of Mrs S before the war with her daughter’s after the war.
Answer:
Before the war Mrs S and her daughter lived a life of comfort and luxury. Their house was full of beautiful things ,and expensive antiques. Their everyday cutlery was made of silver. After the war, Mrs S’s daughter came back to the town alone. The family was probably dead. She lived in a small room. The bread that she ate was dark and tasteless. She had seen fear and insecurity. She did not even have place to keep cutlery. Her lifestyle did not at all resemble her earlier luxurious living.

Question 7.
Justify the title of the story ‘The Address’.
Answer:
‘The Address’ is a title that indirectly brings out the pain that war inflicted on the narrator. The address was 46, Marconi Street where a woman named Mrs Dorling lived with her family.
The address was important to the narrator because her mother had given the family valuables to Mrs Dorling for safekeeping. When after the war the narrator went back to the address she found her family’s precious possessions in an ugly setting. Their value was not appreciated and they were used carelessly.

She was so repelled that she decided to leave the things and forget the address. The address becomes too painful to remember. It becomes symbolic of the shabbiness and the pettiness of Mrs Dorling. She was very keen about getting things back but ironically resolved to forget about them and begin a new life, leaving the past behind.