Packing Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Beehive

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Packing Extra Questions and Answers Class 9 English Beehive

Packing Extra Questions and Answers Short Answer Type

Question 1.
The author remarks, “It’s my energetic nature, I can’t help it.” What did he mean by it?
Answer:
The author remarks that he can’t sit idle and see other people slaving and working. He wanted to get up and supervise his friends in packing. But his offer was taken otherwise and his friends left the entire work of packing to him.

Question 2.
How did George and Harris feel while packing?
Answer:
George and Harris were not good packers. They were nervous and excited. In excitement, they stepped on the things and messed up everything. They were in utter confusion. Jerome tried to help them when they got irritated.

Question 3.
What happened when George and Harris tried to pack the butter?
Answer:
George and Harris were nervous and excited while packing. They tried to pack the butter in the kettle. It would not go in and what was in the kettle, would not come out. They looked for butter everywhere and it was finally found stuck on the back of Harris.

Question 4.
How did Montmorency add to the confusion and chaos?
Answer:
Montmorency, the dog, added to the confusion. He sat on the small things which were to be packed. George and Harris were already nervous. The acts of Montmorency confused and irritated them more.

Question 5.
What did the narrator and his friends do after the packing was over?
Answer:
All the three, Jerome, Harris and George, finished the packing by 12:50 in the night. It was a very big task for them. Their bags were opened and reopened many a time due to confusion. Ultimately they went to sleep to get up at 6:30 in the morning.

Question 6.
What happened to pies while packing?
Answer:
George and Harris were nervous and irritated while, packing. They packed the pies at the bottom. They put heavy things on the top. It was a big mistake. All the pies were smashed to crumbs.

Packing Extra Questions and Answers Long Answer Type

Question 1.
What did the author want to do when he offered his help? How was he misunderstood? Do you think Jerome was a show-off while offering his help? What would you have done if you were Jerome?
Answer:
The author Jerome volunteered his expertise in packing. He just wanted to act as a boss and superintend them. But they misunderstood him and made him do the entire packing. Yes, I think Jerome accepted the work of packing just to show off his skill. His intention was not to pack the things voluntarily, it was an intention to superintend his friends.

He wanted to act as their boss. It is human nature. But his friends were smarter. They sat leisurely and watched him doing the packing. It irritated Jerome. If I had been in place of Jerome, I would not have accepted the work just to boss over them or just to show off my skill. I would have accepted the work to help them without any expectations.

Question 2.
Why did the writer get irritated? Do you think that volunteering sometimes becomes a headache? Was it the expectation of Jerome that became a cause of his headache?
Answer:
Jerome gets irritated when he was misunderstood by his friends. His intention was not to do packing for them. He volunteered just because he wanted to act as a boss and superintend them. But his volunteering became a headache for him. I don’t agree that volunteering becomes headache. It becomes headache only when we have expectations from it. We, as human beings expect appreciation or reward for everything that we do.

And if we don’t get it, we become irritated, and take the work as a burden. In the story, Jerome’s voluntary work becomes a headache for him because he had expectations from his friends. He wanted to satisfy himself by becoming their boss. When he didn’t get the expected response, it became a cause of headache for him.

Question 3.
Lazy friends sometimes become a burden. Do you agree? How should we respond to someone’s help?
Answer:
It’s true that lazy friends often become a burden. In this context, “a wise enemy is better than a foolish friend” is an apt saying. Lazy friends most often remain burden because they do not want to do any work and one has to do the whole work for the sake of one’s friendship. In the story, the author has two friends, Harris and George. Both of them are lazy. They irritate the author who had volunteered to pack for them.

This service becomes a headache for him. As a friend, we should be considerate to our friends who offer their help. We should accept their help with humility and a sense of gratefulness. We should not take undue advantage of their help and become a burden. Cooperation and mutual understanding are essential for a friendship to sustain.

Packing Extra Questions and Answers Reference-to-Context

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.
I impressed the fact upon George and Harris and told them that they had better leave the whole matter entirely to me. They fell into the suggestion with a readiness that had something uncanny about it. George put on a pipe and spread himself over the easy-chair, and Harris cocked his legs on the table and lit a cigar. This was hardly what I intended.

(a) The ‘whole matter’ was related to the issue of …………..
Answer:
packing

(b) …………… sat comfortably on the chair.
Answer:
George

(c) Harris bent the legs on the knees as he sat. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) The word that means the same as ‘something mysterious’ is
Answer:
‘uncanny’

Question 2.
However, I did not say anything, but started the packing. It seemed a longer job than I had thought it was going to be; but I got the bag finished at last, and I sat on it and strapped it. “Ain’t you going to put the boots in?” said Harris. And I looked round, and found I had forgotten them. That’s just like Harris. He couldn’t have said a word until I’d got the bag shut and strapped, of course. And George laughed – one of those irritating, senseless laughs of his.

(a) ‘I’ in the above passage refers to …………
Answer:
Jerome, the author

(b) The author didn’t say anything to ………… and started packing.
Answer:
his friends

(c) The writer felt that Harris could have reminded him about the boots before he had closed
Answer:
the bag

(d) The synonym of the word ‘futile or aimless’ in the passage is
Answer:
‘senseless’

Question 3.
Of course, I had to turn every mortal thing out now, and, of course, I could not find it. I rummaged the things up into much the same state that they must have been before the world was created, and when chaos reigned. Of course, I found George’s and Harris’s eighteen times over, but I couldn’t find my own. I put the things back one by one, and held everything up and shook it. Then I found it inside a boot. I repacked once more.

(a) The author in the above passage was busy finding his …………
Answer:
toothbrush

(b) His toothbrush was found
Answer:
inside a boot

(c) This time the author had given up and didn’t repack. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) The phrase ‘every mortal thing’ in the above lines means
Answer:
each and every common or ordinary thing.

Question 4.
When I had finished, George asked if the soap was in. I said I didn’t care a hang whether the soap was in or whether it wasn’t; and I slammed the bag shut and strapped it, and found that I had packed my spectacles in it, and had to reopen it.

(a) The author completely forgot to pack ………. in the bag.
Answer:
the soap

(b) Instead of the soap he had packed up
Answer:
his spectacles

(c) The author reopened the bag to search for his spectacles. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) The phrase in the passage that means the same as ‘show no interest or concern’ is ……..
Answer:
didn’t care a hang.

Question 5.
And then it was George’s turn, and he trod on the butter. I didn’t say anything, but I came over and sat on the edge of the table and watched them. It irritated them more than anything I could have said. I felt that. It made them nervous and excited, and they stepped on things, and put things behind them, and then couldn’t find them when they wanted them; and they packed the pies at the bottom, and put heavy things on top, and smashed the pies in.

(a) …….. stepped on the butter.
Answer:
George

(b) ‘Them’ in the second line refers to …………
Answer:
George and Harris

(c) They placed the pies at the bottom and then placed other lighter things on them. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find a synonym of ‘collided’ from the passage.
Answer:
‘smashed’

Question 6.
“Most extraordinary thing I ever heard of” said George. “So mysterious!” said Harris. Then George got round at the back of Harris and saw it.

(a) George said that the disappearance of the was the most amazing thing he had known.
Answer:
butter

(b) According to Harris, disappearance of the butter was a ………….
Answer:
mystery

(c) The disappeared butter was found sticking onto George’s back. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) The word in the above lines that means the same as ‘remarkable’ is
Answer:
extraordinary.

Question 7.
He came and sat down on things, just when they wanted to be packed; and he laboured under the fixed belief that, whenever Harris or George reached out their hand for anything, it was his cold damp nose that they wanted. He put his leg into the jam, and he worried the teaspoons, and he pretended that the lemons were rats, and got into the hamper and killed three of them before Harris could land him with the frying-pan.

(a) ‘He’ in the passage refers to ……….
Answer:
Montmorency

(b) According to the dog, looked like rats.
Answer:
lemons

(c) ‘Land him’ in the above lines means
Answer:
hit or punch someone.

(d) Harris had put his leg into the jam. (True/False)
Answer:
False