A House, A Home Summary

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A House, A Home Summary

A House, A Home Summary of the Poem

Poet Lorraine M. Halli discusses the difference between a house and a home. The poet believes in keeping a family together. He emphasized on caring and sharing done amongst the family members.

A house is made up of bricks, stone and hard woods having windows, doors, chimneys. A house is decorated with stuccos, tile floors. The poet discusses about the materials required to make a house. A house is made with these lifeless things.

Whereas in the second part, he discusses about the importance of values in a relationship that binds a family. Selfless love, care and displaying it brings together the members of the family. A home is a place where everyone loves each other. They share love and affection they have for each other.

The Book That Saved the Earth Summary

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The Book That Saved the Earth Summary

The Book That Saved the Earth Summary of the Lesson

The play “The Book That Saved the Earth” is full of imagination.

In it, the different characters like Think-Tank, Noodle, Oop, Omega, etc. play as the Martian living beings, the time set of the play is 25th century. The play tells us in detail as how the book successfully saves the earth from the Martian invasion.

Think-Tank who is the mightiest and the most brilliant among all the Martians is the Commander-in-Chief. Think-Tank conducts the manned space probe in order to ask them their position. At this Think-Tank asks them to show him the place closely.

In fact, they are in a library full of different books. But they fail to understand where they are. Then Think-Tank tries to show his intelligence and tells his crew that the thing in question is a sandwich. Then one of the crew members even eats the comer of a book to confirm the views of Think-Tank.

After some time Noodle suggests Think-Tank that it is not for eating but for communication with ears. After some time Noodle again suggests Think-Tank that it is not for ear communication but for eye communication.

Then they open the books and try to read them but they fail to understand the language. Omega opens a big volume of‘Mother Goose’ and tries to read it. Noodle asks Think-Tank if the chemical department has given them the vitamins to increase intelligence and then read the sandwiches.

As Oop starts reading the books of nursery rhymes to Think-Tank he feels trouble. He leaves the idea of invading. Instead, he tries to save himself from the invasion of the earthlings. He orders his crew to leave the earth at once and he himself runs to safety.

Madam Rides the Bus Summary

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Madam Rides the Bus Summary

Madam Rides the Bus Summary of the Lesson

Valli or Valliammai was a Tamil girl of eight years. She was very much curious about things. She had no playmates. So standing in the doorway of her house had become her favourite pastime. She watched what was happening in the street outside. Thus she had got many new unusual experiences. But she was very much fascinated by the bus ride. It was an unending joy for her.

There travelled a bus between her village and the nearest town on an interval of an hour. She stared at the passengers who got on or off the bus, she listened to the conversations between her neighbours and the people who regularly used the bus.

More often, she asked a few questions from them. In a way she had collected some details about the bus journey. The last destination of the bus was a town. It was about six miles from her village. The fare was thirty paise for one way.

The trip to the town took forty-five minutes. So she planned to, take the one O’clock afternoon bus so that she could return by about two forty-five on one afternoon. It was a fine spring day. The afternoon bus was on the point of leaving the village.

Valli called ‘Stop the bus! Stop the bus! The bus slowed down and the conductor peeped outside. He called her to hurry up. Standing outside the bus, Valli told that she had to go to the town. She showed some coins and got into the bus. The conductor was a jolly fellow.

He called her a fine madam and pointed towards a seat. It was the slack time of the day. So very few passengers were travelling in the bus. Then the conductor asked her if they could start the bus. All passengers were looking at the conductor and Valli.

On hearing the whistle, the bus started. It was a new bus. It had a fine painting of green stripes on the white. The seats were soft and luxurious. In the way, Valli was enjoying everything through her own eyes. The road was narrow. On one side there was a canal.

Beyond it there were palm trees, grassland, mountains, sky and green fields. To have full view, she stood on the seat. Everything looked very wonderful to Valli. An elderly man shouted and called Valli as ‘child’. He asked her to sit down.

Valli was surprised for being the only one called. In an angry way, she looked towards the conductor and demanded the ticket. The conductor punched a ticket and gave her. He asked her not to stand when she had paid for a seat. The bus stopped. Some passenger got on. Valli sat down on her seat lest some passenger should sit over it.

At the time, an elderly woman got into the bus. She sat beside Valli. She questioned her if she was all alone. Valli did not like her. There were big holes in her ears. The earrings were very ugly. She was chewing the betel nut. Valli was fearing lest its juice should fall at any moment.

She again interrogated Valli. In turn Valli gave a curt reply and asked her to mind her own business. But the old woman went on with her talk. She tried to know the house number, town and street, where she was going. Valli was much troubled. She asked her not to bother about her. Then Valli turned her face and stared outside the window. It was her first journey. She had planned it very well. She had saved all her stray coins that came her way.

She resisted the temptation of buying toys and balloons etc. At the village fair too she controlled herself not to enjoy the ride in the merry go round. Thus she had collected enough money for her journey. Her next problems was to slip out of the house. She knew that her mother used to sleep daily after lunch.

Valli decided to use these hours for her journey. Most often she used these hours for her excursion. The bus was rolling across a landscape. Everything seemed to be fast running. But it was passing smoothly leaving all obstacles safely behind. Valli was happy. She clapped her hands with glee.

There came a young cow, running fast, in front of the bus. The driver blew his horn loudly. But the animal became more and more frightened. It galloped in front of the bus. It was funny for Valli. At last the cow moved off the road. The bus came to a rail road crossing.

The train looked like a speck from the distant. The train passed with utmost roar and rattle. It shook the bus even. Then the bus passed through a busy shopping street and came on a wider thoroughfare. Valli was fascinated and happy to see the display of clothes and the big crowd.

She was watching everything. It was the last destination of the bus. Now all the passengers got off the bus. Valli remained there in the bus. The conductor asked if she was not ready to get off the bus. Valli replied that she would return on this same bus and gave her thirty coins to the conductor.

He felt surprised and questioned what the matter was. Valli replied that she only wanted to have a ride in the bus and nothing else. The conductor was greatly amused. He requested her to go and look at the sights till the bus started. But Valli replied that she was much afraid. She went on sitting till the bus resumed its journey. She got her ticket. The same wonderful sights were before her eyes.

Then she suddenly saw a young cow dead by the road side. She enquired the conductor if it was the same cow. The conductor nodded his head. Now she was overcome with sadness. Her memory haunted her. She thought that it had been a lovely animal a little while ago but all her charm was lost.

She no longer wanted to look out of the window. She was glued to her seat. It was three-forty when the bus reached her village. She stood up and told the conductor to see him again. The conductor smiled and answered, “Madam, whenever you feel like a bus ride, come and join us.

And don’t forget to bring your fare”. Valli laughed and went running straight for her home. When Valli entered her house, she saw her mother talking with one of her aunts. She was from South Street. She was a chatterbox. Her mouth never stopped once she started talking. She asked Valli where she had been.

Valli only smiled. Valli told that so many things were happening without their knowledge. Her aunt was surprised and said that Valli was talking like a grown-up lady.

Glimpses of India Summary

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Glimpses of India Summary

A Baker From Goa Summary of the Lesson

Goa is very much influenced by the Portuguese. Their traditional work can be still seen there. The Portuguese are famous for preparing the loaves of bread. We can come across the makers of bread in Goa. The furnaces baking the bread still exist there.

It is a traditional family work and these bakers are known as pader in Goa. The writer tells about his childhood days in Goa when the baker used to be their friend.

He used to visit their house twice a day. In the morning his jingling sound of the bamboo woke them from sleep. They all ran to meet him. The loaves were purchased by the maidservant of the house. But they always ran to get bread bangles. Sometimes the baker had special sweet bread.

His entry created the ‘jhang-jhang’ sound from the bamboo. Through one hand the baker supported the basket on his head and the other hand banged the bamboo on the ground. After greeting the lady of the house by saying ‘Good morning’, the baker would place his basket. He had loaves for the elders’ and the bangles for the children. There used to come a typical fragrance from the loaves.

The villagers were much fond of the sweet bread known as ‘boll The marriage gifts were meaningless without it. So the bakers’ furnace in the village was the most essential thing.

The lady of the house prepared sandwiches on the occasion of her daughter’s engagement. Cakes and lbolinhas’ formed important items on various occasions like Christmas and other festivals.

In those days the bread-seller wore a particular dress known as ‘Kabai’. It was a single piece long frock up to the knees. Even today they can be seen wearing a half pant that reaches just below the knees. People usually comment that he is dressed like ‘a Pader’.

The baker would collect his bill at the end of the month.

They recorded their accounts on the wall in pencil. Baking was a profitable profession in old days. The baker and his family never starved and they looked happy and prosperous.

Coorg Summary of the Lesson

Coorg is situated midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore (now Mangaluru). It is a heaven on earth carried gently by the air with great efforts from the kingdom of God. Here one can find the martial men who have shown their valour in the war.

It is a home of evergreen forests, spices, coffee, wild animals and other kinds of shrubs. During the monsoon, it rains heavily and visitors fail to enjoy the perfect bliss of the earth. From September to March the weather is all embracing and the air breathes of invigorating coffee.

In prime comers one can see coffee estates and colonial bungalows. Coorg or Kodagu is the smallest district of Karnataka. Its people are possibly of Greek or Arabic descent. As the story goes on that a part of Alexander’s army moved south along the coast and settled here since the return became impossible.

So these people married the locals and adopted their rites. Even today we can see some differences from the Hindu mainstream in that place. There is another theory of Arab origin that the Kodagus wear black coat with an embroidered waist belt known as kuppia, it resembles the kuffia worn by the Arabs and the Kurds.

Coorgi homes are very hospitable. There are so many tales of valour related to their sons and fathers. The Coorg Regiment is famous in the Indian Army. General Cariappa, the first Chief of Indian Army was a Coorgi. Only the Kodagus are the people in India who are permitted to carry firearms without a licence. They are famous for showing utmost bravery before the enemy.

There flows the Kaveri river from the hills and forests of Coorg. Fish like Mahaseer and kingfishers etc. are abundant in these waters. Other creatures like squirrels, langurs and elephants enjoy the splash and ripple effect in the clear water.

The elephants can be seen bathing and their mahouts scrub them. The games like rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing, mountain biking and walking trails are favourite with the trekkers.

There one can enjoy the birds, bees, butterflies, Macqus, Malabar squirrels, langurs and slender loris are there to company us. The birds sit on the trees and keep a watchful eyes on the visitors.

The ride on the elephants is very joyous. One can enjoy a climb on the Brahmagiri hills. It provides a clear worth seeing view of Coorg. There one can see the rope bridge which leads to the sixty-four-acre island of Nisargadhama. Walking over this rope-bridge creates trembling sensations in, the body.

There one can come across India’s largest Tibetan colony. It is run by the Buddhist monks. It is near Bylakuppe. It is inhabited robes by monks who wear red, ochre and yellow robes. A number of visitors visit to discover the heart and soul of India in Coorg. One can reach there by reaching Madikeri.

It is the district headquarter. The misty hills, lush forests and coffee plantation will cast a spell on us. From Bangalore (now Bengaluru), Mysore and Mangalore one can reach Coorg by air and rail.

the rainy season. There is the smell of coffee in the air. The people of Coorg are martial men. These people are of Greek or Arabic descent. According to a legend, a part of Alexander’s army stopped and settled here. They married amongst the locals.

Their culture is seen in the martial traditions, marriage and religious rites, they are different from the Hindu mainstream.

These people wear a long black coat with an embroidered waist-belt. This is known as Kuppia and it resembles Kuffia that is worn by the Arabs and the Kurds.
They love traditions of hospitality and this quality makes them unique.

Tea from Assam Summary of the Lesson

Pranjol and Rajvir are class-fellows in Delhi. The parents of Pranjol are living in Assam. Pranjol’s father is a manager of a tea-garden in upper Assam. So Pranjol has invited Rajvir to visit Assam during the summer vacation. Both are in a train journey.

When the train stopped, the vendor called out ‘Chai garam… garam… chai”. Pranjol ordered for two cups of tea. Other passengers were also sipping tea in the compartment. Rajvir told that over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk daily in the world. The train proceeded onwards.

When they were traveling, they came to view a magnificent sight of tea bushes. There were tea plants like the stretch of the sea. They saw the tea plants in orderly rows and a smoke was coming out from a tall chimney of an ugly building. Rajvir was excited to see the tea-garden. Pranjol told that it is a tea country. Rajvir told some legends about tea.

There is a story of the Chinese emperor. He always boiled water before drinking. One day while boiling the water, a few leaves of the twigs fell into the water. It gave a delicious flavour. It is said that they were the tea-leaves.

According to one legend there was an ancient Bodhidharma, an Buddhist ascetic. He felt asleep while meditating. He did not like it and cut off his eyelids and threw them on the ground. Ten tea plants grew out of the eye-lids. When their leaves were put in hot water, the drink removed sleep.

Rajvir told that tea was first drunk in China. ‘Chai’ and ‘chini’ are from China. It was in the sixteenth century that tea came to Europe. That time it was used as medicine. Then the train reached into Mariani junction. The boys collected their luggage.

Pranjol’s parents took them in a car towards Dhekiabari. It was Pranjol’s fathers tea-garden. There were tea bushes on both sides of the road. Women were plucking the tea leaves in bamboo baskets. May to July are the best months of tea yielding.

Glimpses of India Part 3 Summary

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Glimpses of India Part 3 Summary

Tea from Assam Summary of the Lesson

Pranjol and Rajvir are class-fellows in Delhi. The parents of Pranjol are living in Assam. Pranjol’s father is a manager of a tea-garden in upper Assam. So Pranjol has invited Rajvir to visit Assam during the summer vacation. Both are in a train journey.

When the train stopped, the vendor called out ‘Chai garam… garam… chai”. Pranjol ordered for two cups of tea. Other passengers were also sipping tea in the compartment. Rajvir told that over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk daily in the world. The train proceeded onwards.

When they were traveling, they came to view a magnificent sight of tea bushes. There were tea plants like the stretch of the sea. They saw the tea plants in orderly rows and a smoke was coming out from a tall chimney of an ugly building. Rajvir was excited to see the tea-garden. Pranjol told that it is a tea country. Rajvir told some legends about tea.

There is a story of the Chinese emperor. He always boiled water before drinking. One day while boiling the water, a few leaves of the twigs fell into the water. It gave a delicious flavour. It is said that they were the tea-leaves.

According to one legend there was an ancient Bodhidharma, an Buddhist ascetic. He felt asleep while meditating. He did not like it and cut off his eyelids and threw them on the ground. Ten tea plants grew out of the eye-lids. When their leaves were put in hot water, the drink removed sleep.

Rajvir told that tea was first drunk in China. ‘Chai’ and ‘chini’ are from China. It was in the sixteenth century that tea came to Europe. That time it was used as medicine. Then the train reached into Mariani junction. The boys collected their luggage.

Pranjol’s parents took them in a car towards Dhekiabari. It was Pranjol’s father’s tea-garden. There were tea bushes on both sides of the road. Women were plucking the tea leaves in bamboo baskets. May to July are the best months of tea yielding.

Glimpses of India Part 2 Summary

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Glimpses of India Part 2 Summary

Coorg Summary of the Lesson

Coorg is situated midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore (now Mangaluru). It is a heaven on earth carried gently by the air with great efforts from the kingdom of God. Here one can find the martial men who have shown their valour in the war.

It is a home of evergreen forests, spices, coffee, wild animals and other kinds of shrubs. During the monsoon, it rains heavily and visitors fail to enjoy the perfect bliss of the earth. From September to March the weather is all-embracing and the air breathes of invigorating coffee.

In prime comers, one can see coffee estates and colonial bungalows. Coorg or Kodagu is the smallest district of Karnataka. Its people are possible of Greek or Arabic descent. As the story goes on that a part of Alexander’s army moved south along the coast and settled here since the return became impossible.

So these people married the locals and adopted their rites. Even today we can see some difference from the Hindu mainstream in that place. There is another theory of Arab origin that the Kodagus wear black coat with an embroidered waist belt known as kuppia, it resembles the kuffia worn by the Arabs and the Kurds.

Coorgi homes are very hospitable. There are so many tales of valour related to their sons and fathers. The Coorg Regiment is famous in the Indian Army. General Cariappa, the first Chief of Indian Army was a Coorgi. Only the Kodagus are the people in India who are permitted to carry firearms without a licence. They are famous for showing utmost bravery before the enemy.

There flows the Kaveri river from the hills and forests of Coorg. Fish like Mahaseer and kingfishers etc. are abundant in these waters. Other creatures like squirrels, langurs and elephants enjoy the splash and ripple effect in the clear water.

The elephants can be seen bathing and their mahouts scrub them. The games like rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing, mountain biking and walking trails are favourite with the trekkers.

There one can enjoy the birds, bees, butterflies, Maquis, Malabar squirrels, langurs and slender loris are there to company us. The birds sit on the trees and keep a watchful eyes on the visitors.

The ride on the elephants is very joyous. One can enjoy a climb on the Brahmagiri hills. It provides a clear worth seeing view of Coorg. There one can see the rope bridge which leads to the sixty-four-acre island of Nisargadhama. Walking over this rope-bridge creates trembling sensations in, the body.

There one can come across India’s largest Tibetan colony. It is run by the Buddhist monks. It is near Bylakuppe. It is inhabited robes by monks who wear red, ochre and yellow robes. A number of visitors visit to discover the heart and soul of India in Coorg. One can reach there by reaching Madikeri.

It is the district headquarter. The misty hills, lush forests and coffee plantation will cast a spell on us. From Bangalore (now Bengaluru), Mysore and Mangalore one can reach Coorg by air and rail.

the rainy season. There is the smell of coffee in the air. The people of Coorg are martial men. These people are of Greek or Arabic descent. According to a legend, a part of Alexander’s army stopped and settled here. They married amongst the locals.

Their culture is seen in the martial traditions, marriage and religious rites, they are different from the Hindu mainstream.

These people wear a long black coat with an embroidered waist-belt. This is known as Kuppia and it resembles Kuffia that is worn by the Arabs and the Kurds.
They love traditions of hospitality and this quality makes them unique.

Glimpses of India Part 1 Summary Analysis and Explanation

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Glimpses of India Part 1 Summary Analysis and Explanation

A Baker From Goa Summary of the Lesson

Goa is very much influenced by the Portuguese. Their traditional work can be still seen there. The Portuguese are famous for preparing the loaves of bread. We can come across the makers of bread in Goa. The furnaces baking the bread still exist there.

It is a traditional family work and these bakers are known as pader in Goa. The writer tells about his childhood days in Goa when the baker used to be their friend.

He used to visit their house twice a day. In the morning his jingling sound of the bamboo woke them from sleep. They all ran to meet him. The loaves were purchased by the maidservant of the house. But they always ran to get bread bangles. Sometimes the baker had special sweet bread.

His entry created the ‘jhang-jhang’ sound from the bamboo. Through one hand the baker supported the basket on his head and the other hand banged the bamboo on the ground. After greeting the lady of the house by saying ‘Good morning’, the baker would place his basket. He had loaves for the elders’ and the bangles for the children. There used to come a typical fragrance from the loaves.

The villagers were much fond of the sweet bread known as ‘boll The marriage gifts were meaningless without it. So the bakers’ furnace in the village was the most essential thing.

The lady of the house prepared sandwiches on the occasion of her daughter’s engagement. Cakes and lbolinhas’ formed important items on various occasions like Christmas and other festivals.

In those days the bread-seller wore a particular dress known as ‘Kabai’. It was a single piece long frock up to the knees. Even today they can be seen wearing a half pant that reaches just below the knees. People usually comment that he is dressed like ‘a Pader’.

The baker would collect his bill at the end of the month.

They recorded their accounts on the wall in pencil. Baking was a profitable profession in old days. The baker and his family never starved and they looked happy and prosperous.

The Sound of Music Summary

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The Sound of Music Summary

The Sound of Music Introduction

The lesson has been divided into two parts. Both are associated with the subject of music and the personalities who made music their life. Evelyn Glennie turned out to be the most sought after musician internationally in spite of her disability.

She was profoundly deaf but learnt to listen to music with her body instead of the ears. She became the perfect player of the xylophone and earned huge name and fame. Bismillah Khan, on the other hand, became India’s most revered shehnai maestro.

He was the winner of Bharat Ratna, the highest civilian award of India. He performed not only in India but abroad too.

The Sound of Music Summary Part 1

Evelyn Glennie is a multi-percussionist, who can play thousands of instruments to perfection. She is the most sought after musician of the world. She reached the pinnacle in spite of being profoundly deaf. But she excelled in the field of music by dint of her hard work and firm determination.

Evelyn’s loss of hearing had been gradual. It was first noticed by her mother when she was just eight-years-old, waiting to play the piano. By the time she was eleven, it was discovered that her hearing was severely impaired as a result of gradual nerve damage.

It was a big shock for her and her family. But she was determined to lead a normal life and pursue her career in music. She was greatly supported by percussionist Ron Forbes who spotted her potential and decided to work with her. He began by turning two large drums to different notes and advised Evelyn to not listen with her ears but try to sense it some other way.

Soon, she discovered that she could sense certain notes in different parts of her body. She also learnt to open her mind and body to sounds and vibrations. After that she never looked back. She decided to make music her life. She joined the

prestigious Royal Academy of Music and got excellent marks. She gradually moved from orchestral work to solo performances. She proved her excellence in this field too.

Evelyn Glennie believed in hard work. It was her hard work combined with firm determination which made her the world’s most sought-after multi-percussionist with a mastery of some thousand instruments.

In 1991 she was presented with the Royal Philharmonic Society’s prestigious Soloist of the Year Award. She gives free concerts in prisons and hospitals. She also takes classes for young musicians.

Thus, she is a shining inspiration for the deaf and handicapped children. She has proved that nothing is impossible. You just fix your goal and start doing hard work. You will get there.

The Sound of Music Summary Part 2

This part of the lesson throws light on the origin of the shehnai and the contributions of Ustad Bismillah Khan to bring this musical instrument onto the classical stage.

Pungi, a musical instrument, was banned by Emperor Aurangzeb because of its unpleasant sound. It was improved by a barber of a family of professional musicians. The barber brought several changes in this instrument until it produced soft and melodious sounds. He then played it before royalty and got immense appreciation. Since it was first played in the Shah’s chambers by a nai, the instrument came to be known as the ‘shehnai’.

The sound of shehnai began to be considered auspicious. But its use was limited to temples and weddings. It was Bismillah Khan who popularised this instrument in India and abroad. Bismillah Khan belonged to the Benaras Gharana. He was born on 21 March 1916 at Dumraon in Bihar. His father, grandfather and other paternal ancestors were great shehnai players.

Bismillah Khan began to show his interest in music when he was just five-year-old. As a young child he would regularly go to the Bihariji temple to sing the Bhojpuri ‘Chaita’. He watched his maternal uncles practising the shehnai with great fascination. Slowly, he started getting lessons in playing the instrument and would sit practising throughout the day. He made the river Ganga his favourite spot to practise in solitude. At the age of 14, he accompanied his uncle to the Allahabad Music Conference where he got huge appreciation at the end of the recital. The opening of the All India Radio in Lucknow in 1938 proved to be a big break for him. His shehnai came to be heard very often on radio afterwards.

Bismillah Khan greeted the independent India with his shehnai from the Red Fort on 15 August, 1947. He travelled far and wide giving many memorable performances and won many national and international awards. He became the first Indian to perform at the prestigious Lincoln Centre Hall in the United States of America. He also took part in the World Exposition in Montreal, in the Cannes Art Festival and in the Osaka Trade Fair. The national awards conferred on him included the Padmashri, the Padma Bhushan and the Padma Vibhushan. In 2001, he was awarded the Bharat Ratna. India’s highest civilian award.

Bismillah Khan loved his country deeply. When he was in a foreign country, he kept yearning for India. He was very fond of Dumraon and Benaras. He could not stay away from Benaras because the river Ganga was there. He also got huge success in the celluloid world. He gave his music in two films. His composition ‘DU ka khilona hai toot gay a….,’ turned to be a nationwide record-breaker. But he could not come to terms with the artificial glamour of the film world and remained a true devotee of music throughout his life.

Bholi Summary Analysis and Explanation

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Bholi Summary Analysis and Explanation By Khwaja Ahmad Abbas

About the Author Khwaja Ahmad Abbas

Author Name Khwaja Ahmad Abbas
Born 7 June 1914, Panipat
Died 1 June 1987, Mumbai
Books The world is my village, The Thirteenth Victim, Distant Dream 2Nd/ Ed.
Awards National Film Award for Best Feature Film
Khwaja Ahmad Abbas - bholi summary analysis and explanation class 10
Khwaja Ahmad Abbas

Bholi Summary of the Lesson

This story is all about a simple village girl named Bholi. Her real name was Sulekha. But fate deceived her and when she was ten months old, she fell off the cot damaging some part of her brain. As a result, she could pick up speech only after she was five years old, but she stammered.

Later on, when she was two years old, she had an attack of small pox that left her with blank spots all over the body. The other children often made fun of her and mimicked her. Therefore, she talked very little.

Numberdar Ramlal has seven children in all—three sons and four daughters. Bholi was the youngest. All other were healthy and strong except Bholi. Bholi was seven years old when a primary school opened in their village.

The tehsildar came to perform the opening ceremony of the school. He told Ramlal that as a revenue official and as a representative of the government in the village, he should send his daughter to the school and set an example before the villagers.

When he consulted his wife about the issue, his wife did not agree with him. Yet she decided to send Bholi to the school.

The next day, Bholi was given a bath, and a new dress to wear. Her mother makes her hair and then she was sent to the school. When her father left her in the school, she sat in a comer in the class. When her teacher asked her name, she stammered and the children started laughing.

At this Bholi started weeping. But the teacher’s voice was soft and soothing. It encouraged her a lot and finally she could tell her full name. Then the teacher told her that if she would come daily to school, she would speak without a stammer and one day she would become the most educated girl in the village.

Then no one will dare to laugh at her. Then they will listen to her carefully.

Years passed and the village now turned into a small town. One night Ramlal consulted his wife about the proposal made by Bishamber, a grocer in the neighboring village. His wife readily agreed to it. Bholi was also listening this conversation. The day of her marriage came.

When the bridegroom was about to garland her, some lady pulled her veil down showing her face to him. The bridegroom had a quick glance at her face and noticed pox marks on her face. At this, he asked Ramlal to give him five thousand rupees as dowry in order to marry that ugly girl.

After some arguments, Ramlal handed over the money to Bishamber. But Bholi asked his father to take money back from him as she did not want to marry that old lame and greedy person. Everybody was surprised because Bholi was not stammering at all. The bridegroom went back with his baraat.

Ramala could not lift his head due to shame and grief. He told Bholi that no one will marry her now. But Bholi said to him that she would serve his parents in their old age and teach in the same school where she had learnt so much.